Buffoonery

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Buffoonery

 

an acting technique that is usually found in comedies. It is characterized by the performer’s striving to maximally emphasize the external distinctive features of the character and by extreme exaggeration. Buffoonery developed in the popular open-air theaters of mimes and minstrels-cum-clowns. It was used in the Italian commediadell’arte and penetrated into the dramaturgy of J. B. Molière, C. Goldoni, A. V. Sukhovo-Kobylin, V. V. Mayakovsky, and other writers. la. D. Shumskii, A. G. Ozhogin, and V. I. Zhivokini were masters of buffoonery in the Russian prerevolutionary theater. Soviet masters include G. M. Iaron and V. Ia. Khenkin. Buffoonery is particularly popular in the circus.

References in periodicals archive ?
I'm mindful I'm going magnificent then look buffoon got no "So I'm tempering that enthusiasm with a little bit of realism but I am hopeful, like I've said before, that we can add two or three players in positions where we feel we need a little bit more.
Bonneville's Head of Deliverance Ian Fletcher ponders the results of a study which suggests making the diving pool shallower, all the while continuing his unenviable struggle to stay afloat in a sea of buffoons.
Without further ado, I would like to encourage you to play the role of the buffoon and the director when teaching literature.
In Velazquez's case the role of Valladolid as buffoon was established at the court, while Manet (here curiously mixing the body of Leon Leenhoff, his wife's illegitimate son, with facial features of Victorine Meurent) had to invent the fifer.
Frances Cress Welsing is "an intellectual buffoon of the first order.
Note, for example, this passage: "[York] has been variously portrayed as a giant of superb physique and stamina; a buffoon who contributed nothing more than comic relief to the expedition; a man whose blackness so appealed to the Indian women that he left a trail of kinkey-haired children across the West.
We also see him as a bestial buffoon in David Parsons's Instinct and other surprises.
Everett Koop is condescending throughout his interview, making no effort to conceal his contempt for this buffoon who thinks the penis is a bone and who wonders what it would be like to have a mobile phone surgically implanted in his chest.
Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon, called Voltaire a buffoon.
The English clown was descended from the Vice character of the medieval mystery plays, a buffoon and prankster who could sometimes deceive even the Devil.
Originally Arlecchino, a stock figure of commedia dell ' arte (possibly from the name of a medieval demon or goblin), Harlequin became the buffoon of French and then of English pantomime.