bugle

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Related to bugled: bugling

bugle,

brass wind musical instrument consisting of a conical tube coiled once upon itself, capable of producing five or six harmonics. It is usually in G or B flat. Its principal use is for military and naval bugle calls, such as taps and reveille, and, in earlier times, for hunting calls. In the early 19th cent., keyed bugles were made in order to obtain a complete scale.

reducer

reducer, 2
1. A thinner or solvent; used to lower the viscosity of a paint, varnish, or lacquer.

bugle

1
Music a brass instrument similar to the cornet but usually without valves: used for military fanfares, signal calls, etc.

bugle

2. any of several Eurasian plants of the genus Ajuga, esp A. reptans, having small blue or white flowers: family Lamiaceae (labiates)

bugle

3
a tubular glass or plastic bead sewn onto clothes for decoration
References in periodicals archive ?
I bugled again, detecting pieces of him ambling up a defunct logging skid, ducking and sprinting to clear a line of thronged fir.
John bugled again, and Tom made a couple soft cow calls.
The bull bugled several times as I worked toward him, so I hurried up the steep hillside to get in front of him and his cows.
As these two monarchs sounded off, three more bulls bugled.
Doug let out an almost imperceptible mew on his diaphragm and immediately an elk bugled back from a distance of about 200 yards down the valley
I have bugled in thick country at 10 yards where we can't see each other.
One Bull Bugled just above me, another was hollering out front, and a third responded from below It was one of those magical mornings when the woods ring with bugling.
The bull bugled again on his own, which gave us a fix on his position.
The bull bugled and stopped abruptly to stare in our direction.
Numerous times I bugled and he answered, but then he would only vanish before I could move in.
Every time Jay bugled, I would step a few yards closer to the bull while climbing over logs, wading through head-high brush, and dodging pine branches.