bulbil


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bulbil

[′bəl·bəl]
(botany)
A secondary bulb usually produced on the aerial part of a plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
But if you leave the weeds in place for a few months, when you try to pull them out the bulbils will be left behind.
Expect bulbils or bulblets to form flowers that look just like their parents in one to three years.
One variety in particular, called polystichum setiferum proliferum, regularly makes these bulbils.
These have been thought to be abscission scars of flowers (Rhode 1820), roots (Carruthers 1879), bulbils (Stur 1875), cones (Lindley and Hutton 1833; Thomson 1880) and branches (Watson 1908; Renier 1910; Lindsey 1915; Jonker 1976).
After growing them on for two years, some walking onion bulbils I had have finally produced full-size bulbs.
Propagation can also be achieved using bulbils produced in the axils of the leaves, although producing bulbs large enough to produce a flower takes longer.
Fortunately, when this plant was prevented from being cross pollinated, bulbils were produced in the flower head and it could be propagated.
I've always cosseted this hybrid, its beauty is stunning and I'm pleased to say, so long as you keep them on the move and frequently divide the rice-grain-like immature bulbils, they can be grown outdoors with only additional protection from pounding rain.
On top of this they reproduce by making mini-bulbs (or bulbils if you're a purist).
In addition to hazelnuts, the fill of the `pit' feature at Staosnaig produced significant remains of the tubers and bulbils of lesser celandine, leading to an interpretation that this plant contributed in a definite way to the Mesolithic diet.
Keep them dry, but be sure to collect the little rice grain bulbils which will have appeared, as these can also be potted up in spring to start new plants.