bullbaiting


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Related to bullbaiting: Bear baiting

bullbaiting,

17th-century amusement, particularly popular in England, in which trained dogs (bulldogs) attacked a tethered bull. Bullbaiting, along with bullrunning (in which the bull was run down and killed by humans), bearbaiting, cockfighting, and dogfighting, was prohibited in Great Britain by an act of Parliament in 1835.
References in periodicals archive ?
some that it was a Biblical repute The last time bullbaiting took place seems to have been early in October, 1838.
Hackwood gives a similar colourful Referring to the early 19th stated: ''At that period, as were largely addicted to dueling, the patronage and similar so were the generally to cockfighting, bullbaiting brutalities they to dignify name of was no place sunk in of degradation attracted blood sport open land on the with Warwickshire 1820s and blood only their to have 1838.
37; and for more on the Market Place and the bullbaitings there, see Edward Trollope.
Prohibitions of bearbaiting, bullbaiting, and cockfighting went onto the books in the year of Victoria's accession to the throne, but it is not clear when they were actually enforced; dogfights continued to be staged beyond midcentury in the Potteries (Greenslade 141; Warrillow, Sociological History 141).
Early Grimsby apparently mounted an array of traditional customs, games, and ceremonies of the kind that one might expect in any English town, including those at Christmas, Whitsuntide, and Midsummer, and ranging, according to local antiquatians, from processions and May games to bullbaiting and cockfighting.
The magnificent English bulldog was originally bred for bullbaiting, an occupation that probably distressed both dog and bull.
The public street, well into the 18th century, was the favorite place for adult play: football, wrestling, ninepins, shovel board, bear- and bullbaiting, cockfighting, and meetings of friends took place in crowded streets and alleys and open places.
Lots of things were illegal in 19th-century Birmingham: prize-fighting, bullbaiting, gambling, dog-fighting, the list is endless.