bummer


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bummer

[′bəm·ər]
(forestry)
A low truck with two wheels for carrying logs, or a tracked cart for dragging them.
(mining engineering)
The person who runs conveyors in a quarry or mine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bummer ewe didn't have a lamb this spring, but the other four ewes each had a single lamb.
Based on the characters from the popular books series-12 million copies in print in 23 different languages-the feature film centers on Judy, her younger and very annoying brother Stink and their adventurous Aunt Opal as they search for an exciting, not bummer summer.
As the series' fourth season opens, the cops remain as clueless as ever -- they applaud Reno's ``automated suicide hotline,'' since working the actual phone lines was a major bummer.
Just great Robitussin-fueled trash rock, this shit has some psych and can induce a bummer in the most steadfast of flower children.
The consensus was that everyone said, `What a bummer.
All the threat, fear, and intimidation seem to handily coalesce into a well turned-out challenge which dances perilously close to the unbecoming bummer of bitterness.
Summer fun can be a bummer if you constantly have to take cover; from mosquitoes, that is.
It is, unquestionably, an immense bummer that Ol' Dirty Bastard is dead, but it's somewhat suspect that he has a biography.
Personally, I know what a bummer it is to have the earliest curfew, and it's easier if, once in a while, the party ends when you leave.
Yes, this state of the heavyweight division is kind of a bummer.