bunker

(redirected from bunkers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

bunker

an obstacle on a golf course, usually a sand-filled hollow bordered by a ridge

Bunker

 

A self-unloading steel or reinforced-concrete (occasionally wooden) receptacle (container, coffer, or bin) for the bulk storage of granulated or lumpy materials such as grain, sand, cement, coke, coal, or ore. To permit gravity unloading, the lower portion of a bunker is built with inclined walls (for example, in the form of inverted truncated cones or pyramids). There are also doors and conveyors in the lower part to control discharge of the material. The modern bunker is a highly automated unit having centralized control for loading and unloading and for monitoring filling, discharge, and the level of stored material with programmed control. “Bunker” is also the name for magazine equipment that feeds workpieces to automated lines and for the containers on certain machines, such as reapers.

(2) A ship’s bunker, a place on a ship for storing the regular supply of solid fuel usually connected with the boiler compartment; the fuel supply (solid or liquid) that is calculated on the basis of the length of a voyage, with the addition of a so-called storm supply.

(3) In German military terminology, a bunker is a shelter or emplacement.

bunker

[′bəŋ·kər]
(civil engineering)
A bin, often elevated, that is divided into compartments for storing material such as coal or sand.
(mechanical engineering)
A space in a refrigerator designed to hold a cooling element.
(ordnance)
A fortified structure for the protection of personnel, a defended gun position, or a defensive position.

bunker

1. A compartmented bin, often elevated, for storage of aggregates, sand, coal, etc.
2. A space in a refrigerator for ice or a cooling element.
References in classic literature ?
An' when I come un tull Auckland short o' coal, after lettun' her druft sux days wuth the fires out tull save the coal, an' wuth only twenty tons in my bunkers, I was thunkun' o' the lossin' o' time an' the expense, an' tull save the owners I took her un an' out wi'out pilotage.
From Valparaiso he had gone to Australia, light, a matter of six thousand miles on end with a stormy passage and running short of bunker coal.
An' me on a wunter passage, blowin' a luvin' gale half the time, wuth hurricane force in atweenwhiles, an' hove to sux days, wuth engines stopped an' bunker coal runnun' short, an' me wuth a mate thot stupid he could no pass a shup's light ot night wi'out callun' me tull the brudge.
An' ut was ot Comox, takun' un bunker coal, I got the letter from the owners.
They were now off the coal bunkers of Long Wharf, and the boy put the skiff about, heading toward San Francisco.
I meant to be as steady as Bunker Hill Monument; but here I am again, worse than ever, for last quarter I did n't say anything to father, he was so bothered by the loss of those ships just then, so things have mounted up confoundedly.
I have no doubt that it was a principle they fought for, as much as our ancestors, and not to avoid a three-penny tax on their tea; and the results of this battle will be as important and memorable to those whom it concerns as those of the battle of Bunker Hill, at least.
He could not see it, the inside of the bunker coated with coal-dust being perfectly and impenetrably black; but he heard it sliding and clattering, and striking here and there, always in the neighbourhood of his head.
He had no mind to get battered to pieces in that bunker.
Its howls and shrieks seemed to take on, in the emptiness of the bunker, something of the human character, of human rage and pain -- being not vast but infinitely poignant.
And he discovered in himself a desire for a light, too -if only to get drowned by -- and a nervous anxiety to get out of that bunker as quickly as possible.
I was an officer in Chicago before ever I came to this darned coal bunker, and I know a Chicago crook when I see one.