burden


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burden

1
Nautical
a. the cargo capacity of a ship
b. the weight of a ship's cargo

burden

2
1. a line of words recurring at the end of each verse of a ballad or similar song; chorus or refrain
2. another word for bourdon

burden

[′bərd·ən]
(electricity)
The amount of power drawn from the circuit connecting the secondary terminals of an instrument transformer, usually expressed in volt-amperes.
(engineering)
The distance from a drill hole to the more or less vertical surface of rock that has already been exposed by blasting or excavating.
The volume of the rock to be removed by blasting in a drill hole.
(geology)
All types of rock or earthy materials overlying bedrock.
(metallurgy)
The material which is melted in a direct arc furnace.
In an iron blast furnace, the ratio of iron and flux to coke and other fuels in the charge.

burden

1. Earthy material, rock, etc., which overlays bedrock.
2. In blasting, the distance between the blasting charge and the free face of the material to be blasted.
References in classic literature ?
Out burdens are here, our road is before us, and the longing for goodness and happiness is the guide that leads us through many troubles and mistakes to the peace which is a true Celestial City.
Her marriage with young Burden was the subject of sharp comment at the time.
As Sindbad was relating his adventures chiefly on account of the porter, he ordered, before beginning his tale, that the burden which had been left in the street should be carried by some of his own servants to the place for which Hindbad had set out at first, while he remained to listen to the story.
This double burden soon proved too much for my already overtaxed beast, and thus our speed was terribly diminished, for the others would proceed no faster than the slowest of us could go.
All this, it seems to me, makes it important that the whole Nation lend a hand in trying to lift the burden of ignorance from the South.
Her influence continued through many years, and I can question it now only in the undue burden she seems to throw upon the individual, and her failure to account largely enough for motive from the social environment.
There was still another reason why he did not wish to interfere with the Waziri--they were bearing the great burden of treasure in the direction he wished it borne.
Look where I might, the happy by-gone time looked back in mockery, and the voices of the past came to me with their burden of reproach: See what your life was once
The truth is, Socrates, that these regrets, and also the complaints about relations, are to be attributed to the same cause, which is not old age, but men's characters and tempers; for he who is of a calm and happy nature will hardly feel the pressure of age, but to him who is of an opposite disposition youth and age are equally a burden.
The unnatural parent seems determined to make her daughter's life a burden, if she will not yield to her desires.
Why sufficeth not the beast of burden, which renounceth and is reverent?
The laborers with us, the peasants, bear all the burden of labor, and are so placed that however much they work they can't escape from their position of beasts of burden.