burh


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burh

1.The communal fortification of an ancient Anglo-Saxon village.
2. A borough.
References in periodicals archive ?
And the Burh family have taken a shine to northern cuisine.
The two rulers each developed a mobile standing army and built burhs, fortified settlements, which provided secure bases from which Viking raids were opposed.
21) ah forbon Crist [thorn]a mycclan burh & [thorn]a halgan Gerusalem swa forhogdlice nemde forbon be [thorn]a but therefore Christ the great city and the holy Jerusalem so despicable mentioned because burhware him waeron for heora ungeleafan & mandaedum swi[thiorn]e forhogde & ungecorene citizens him were for their unbelief and sin very despicable and reprobate 'but, nevertheless, Christ the great city and the holy Jerusalem so contemptuously mentioned because the citizens were to him, because of their unbelief and wickedness, very despicable and reprobate'
amp; hine heton burh bismornysse witegian hwa [thorn]aet waere pe hine [eth]onne slohge.
fourth-nineth century); 300-500 years dark earth sealed by (eighth century Saxon deposits and Saxon hearth) rampart of burh (c.
Re-assessment of the Anglo-Saxon archaeology of Avebury, North Wiltshire, suggests that a fortified settlement, or burh, was established on the western side of the henge during the 9th century AD.
From east to west the proposed burh measures 270 m, the western side is 300 m in length, whilst the eastern side is shorter at 200 m.
It could be suggested that the displaced sculpture belongs to the period of burh construction and that the standing fabric represents reconstruction or rebuilding before the decline of the settlement to one of a more rural character.
Similarly, BUND 2,21,14,4 (in India, any artificial embankment, a dam, dyke or causeway) and VAND 22,1,14,4 BURH 2,21,18,8 (borough) BUSI 2,21,19 9 (busy) \ (wand) are digital charades.
In the case of proper nouns, DOE rather too frequently in AE and B, as in C and D, fails to mention instances of ordinary words as name elements (the place-name elements bece and beonet, and the personal-name elements beadu, beo, blad and burh are not recorded).
Examples of complete obstruent devoicing are plenty in the case of changes like in OE burz > burh 'town' or PGmc hlass > hlaf 'loaf', etc.