burnable poison

burnable poison

[′bərn·ə·bəl ′pȯiz·ən]
(nucleonics)
A neutron absorber that is incorporated in the fuel or fuel cladding of a nuclear reactor and gradually burns up under neutron irradiation. Also known as burnout poison.
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These included the early development of the burnable poison concept for nuclear submarines (George worked on Admiral Rickover's project at General Electric early in his career), demonstration of the first diode electron beam pumped lasers (George worked on these at Cornell University with Norman Rostoker in the early 1970s), the exploration of various advanced laser concepts (George worked on many concepts, such as nuclear-pumped and X-ray lasers with his students and others at the University of Illinois).
In addition, it is possible, and even likely, that the fuel-element manufacturing process will constrain achievable fuel and burnable poison loadings, and thus achievable reactor-energy density and size.
Standardized small modular reactor designs manufactured in large numbers will allow for efficient and cost effective scientific and engineering studies of cores, steam generators, reactor vessels, rod drive mechanisms, burnable poisons, radiation shielding, electronic controls and instrumentation, along with primary and secondary chemistry and material selection for corrosion control and longer operating life.