burning velocity

burning velocity

[′bər·niŋ və′läs·əd·ē]
(chemistry)
The normal velocity of the region of combustion reaction (reaction zone) relative to nonturbulent unburned gas, in the combustion of a flammable mixture.

flame spread

Flaming combustion along a surface (not to be confused with the transfer of flame by air currents).
References in periodicals archive ?
u] represent maximum temperature and the burning velocity of the propagated flame in a combustible mixture of organic fuel particles, respectively.
the nature of the gaseous environment, with the aim of classifying the optical hazard of the atmosphere in terms analogous to the electrical case, and of investigating thoroughly the minimum ignition energy, the auto ignition temperature and the burning velocity.
A compact combustion chamber design incorporates burning velocity and cooling performance suitable for an engine that emphasizes torque characteristics in the rpm ranges actually used by a 125cc scooter.
Burning Velocity (BV) and minimum ignition energy (MIE) are physical properties that can be measured and allow classification of flammable substances.
Addition of an optional 2L subclass to the existing Class 2 flammability classification, which signifies Class 2 refrigerants with a burning velocity less than or equal to 10 cm/s.
Hydrogen has unique criteria including wide flammability limits, high flame speed and burning velocity (Verhelst et al.
The influence of additives on flame speed, also known as burning velocity, is particularly revealing in that only small amounts of additives are required to strongly affect flame propagation.
Since burning velocity increases with pressure, it is possible, in theory, that if enough powder was confined to allow it to burn and accelerate long enough, pressure might reach the point of detonation.
Since flame propagation of 2L refrigerants is much less stable than that of highly flammable hydrocarbons, it is necessary to understand the capability and precision of burning velocity test methods by measuring the burning velocities ([S.
As shown in Table 1, refrigerants that have a burning velocity (BV) of 10 cm/sec or less, defined by ASHRAE 34, fall into Class 2L.
This paper presents measurements and numerical calculations of the burning velocity of 1,1-diflurorethane (R-152a, C[H.