butterfly effect


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butterfly effect

[′bəd·ər‚flī i‚fekt]
(physics)
In a chaotic system, the ability of miniscule changes in initial conditions (such as the flap of a butterfly's wings) to have far-reaching, large-scale effects on the development of the system (such as the course of weather a continent away).
References in periodicals archive ?
Butterfly Effect and Its Influence in Strategic Management:
In Beirut, I met 25 Syrian children, aged between six and 13, who had participated in the Butterfly Effect and I watched their play, We Came Out Into The Light.
Some students report that learning about the butterfly effect was a high point of the course.
You are living in the country that can create the biggest of butterfly effect.
This dramatic change will have a butterfly effect on the Asia-Pacific oil market, and even the international market.
THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT 3: REVELATIONS (18, pounds 15.
Summary: In nature, every action has consequences, a phenomenon called the butterfly effect.
In short, the butterfly effect over the ocean could end up triggering a hurricane like "Katherina" or a tsunami.
Shown in the photo are the 505 Butterfly Effect, 502 Unagi and 504 Grasshopper.
The Butterfly Effect film is based on the chaos theory teaching us that small events can have important consequences illustrated by butterfly flapping its wings in Asia could result in a hurricane halfway around the world.
The range of issues covered is perhaps demonstrated by citing some specific examples of entry topics: collective agriculture, aquaculture, farmland conservation, agrodiversity and seeds, elephants, Endangered Species Act, Dian Fossey, genetics and genetic engineering, mad cow disease, whales and whaling, biomagnification, Human Genome Project, volatile organic compounds, butterfly effect, ocean currents, community forestry, cultural ecology, wind energy, continental shelf, Grand Canyon, Charles Darwin, Ralph Nader, postcolonialism, Earth First