cespitose

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cespitose

[′ses·pə‚tōs]
(botany)
Tufted; growing in tufts, as grass.
Having short stems forming a dense turf.
References in periodicals archive ?
This species is recognized by its lignicolous habit, presence of prominent yellowish white subiculum, caespitose growth, small saccate basidiomata (up to 20 mm wide), and its fibrillose, distinct, and delimited peristome.
Plant mass formed by entangled filaments, caespitose, yellowish to yellowish brown; main filament and branches distinct; main filaments with up to four rows of cells, 56.
Plants from the type locality have caespitose stems, linear, weakly plicate pinnae, single inflorescences, and spiny pollen, whereas plants from two different localities north and south of the type locality have solitary stems, narrowly cuneate, strongly plicate pinnae, multiple inflorescences and pollen without spines.
Some prefer a moist soil, including the tufted hair grass, Deschampsia caespitose, and another of my favourites, the Japanese blood grass Red Baron (Imperata cylindrical).
It grows on very shallow soil, is caespitose, and has simple inflorescences.
Phenotypic selection within each cycle centered on those genotypes with the caespitose growth habit rather than spreading genotypes.
ramosa due to its caespitose form, however height was the best predictor in this analysis.
Caespitose (tuft-forming) seaweeds are ubiquitous in the intertidal environment, and in the lower levels the most conspicuous seaweeds are rhodophyceans of the genus Laurencia, although there are also phaeophytes of the genera Ectocarpus and Chnoospora, in addition to highly-branched chlorophytes of the genera Cladophora and Chaetomorpha.
Nassella pulchra is a caespitose, nonrhizomatous, long-lived species (Bartolome and Gemmill 1981) and was probably much more abundant in many California grasslands prior to European settlement.
Brachypodium sylvaticum is a perennial, caespitose grass of the tribe Triticeae (Clayton and Renvoize 1986), which is native to temperate Eurasia but has also been introduced to other parts of the world (e.