cage

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cage

1. Engineering a skeleton ring device that ensures that the correct amount of space is maintained between the individual rollers or balls in a rolling bearing
2. Informal the basket used in basketball
3. Informal the goal in ice hockey

Cage

John. 1912--92, US composer of experimental music for a variety of conventional, modified, or invented instruments. He evolved a type of music apparently undetermined by the composer, such as in Imaginary Landscape (1951) for 12 radio sets. Other works include Reunion (1968), Apartment Building 1776 (1976), and Europeras 3 and 4 (1990)

Cage

 

(in mining), a hoisting device for transporting cars loaded with minerals through the main mine shaft to the surface and for lowering and raising workers, materials, and equipment. The cage is a metal compartment, with devices for guiding it along the conductors, arresting devices (gates) to prevent the cars from rolling out spontaneously, and suspension and parachute devices. The cages travel along wood or metal guides in vertical mine shafts and on rails in sloping shafts. Cages may be the tipping, nontipping, or combination type and single-stage or multistage.

What does it mean when you dream about a cage?

A cage may indicate the dreamer feels cooped up. Being in the cage may signify the need to escape from a confining situation or relationship.

cage

[kāj]
(crystallography)
A void occurring in a crystal structure capable of trapping one or more foreign atoms.
(mechanical engineering)
A frame for maintaining uniform separation between the balls or rollers in a bearing. Also known as separator.
(mining engineering)
The car which carries personnel and materials in a mine hoist.
(petroleum engineering)
A component in a sucker rod pump that contains the valve ball and maintains it at a correct operating distance from the valve seats.
(physical chemistry)
An aggregate of molecules in the condensed phase that surrounds fragments formed by thermal or photochemical dissociation or pairs of molecules in a solution that have collided without reacting.

cage

1. Any rigid, reinforced assembly, ready for placing in position.
2. A metal enclosure for balcony spotlights.
3. A chantry or chapel screened by open tracery.

cage

Mechanically locking the gimbals of a gyroscope so that it will not be damaged by rough handling or radical maneuvers. A caging button or knob is provided on some gyro instruments to prevent damage to them. It is also used when a gyro has tumbled and needs to be re-erected.

CAGE

Early system on IBM 704. Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959).

Cage

(dreams)
This dream symbol suggests that you may be experiencing inhibition and powerlessness in some areas of your life. Additionally, you may be feeling restricted and have concerns about your personal freedom. (Who holds the key to the cage in your dream?) Consider all of the details in the dream and look for its possible source (i. e., family life, relationships, thoughts and/or feelings, or work life).
References in classic literature ?
The following morning the cages would be filled with a new consignment of victims, and so on throughout the ten days of the games.
Once while Tess was at the window where the cages were ranged, giving her lesson as usual, she thought she heard a rustling behind the bed.
For an instant silence reigned in the great amphitheatre, then a wild shout arose from the cages of the doomed.
She was alone in the southern tower, with her sister Jacqueline, a bell of lesser size, shut up in a smaller cage beside hers.
That poor lady, for instance, consulted her for advice when, one day, she opened Cassandra's bedroom door on a mission of discovery, and found the ceiling hung with mulberry-leaves, the windows blocked with cages, and the tables stacked with home-made machines for the manufacture of silk dresses.
I could not have imagined then that you would want to sell our furniture, and take a house in Bride Street, where the rooms are like cages.
Rarely, except for their acts, were they taken out from their cages.
Now she'll go prancing round with bird cages and baskets and carts and pigs, for all I know, in her ears, as the other girls do, and won't she look like a goose?
At the Creation, animals of all kinds which had been kept chained up were let loose suddenly, and ran among the people, while pigeons set free from cages flew over their heads.
These birds are not unfrequently kept either in cages or in courtyards, with their wings cut.
The animals in cages, which gradually learn to get out, perform random movements at first, which are purely instinctive.
Children stopping before the cage are fascinated, men turn away with an air of disgust, and women linger for a moment, trying per- haps to remember which one of their male acquain- tances the thing in some faint way resembles.