callus

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callus:

see corns and callusescorns and calluses,
thickenings of the outer layer of skin where there is irritation or constant pressure. Corns are cone-shaped with their points protruding into the dermis, or inner layer of skin. They usually have hard, shiny surfaces surrounded by red, painful areas.
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Callus

 

(1) Tissue formed in plants on the surface of a wound (cracks, taps, the bases of cuttings, and areas of concrescence of stock and scion). A callus promotes the healing of wounds. Consisting of thin-walled parenchymal cells, a callus develops when there is cell division of any living tissue of the plant (cambium or phloem) in the peripheral zone of the pith, lying next to the protoxylem. Adventitious roots and buds, particularly with grafting, often develop in the callus. (2) Corpus callosum, an accumulation of callóse that obstructs the sieve plate when the sieve tubes of the phloem age. Use of the term in this sense is obsolete.


Callus

 

a thickening of the horny layer of skin as a result of constant pressure or friction. Calluses usually appear on the palms, soles, and other parts of the body that are in constant contact with tough surfaces. The cracks formed on the surface of a callus may hinder one’s ability to work, and they can also be portals of entry for pyogenic microbes, resulting in such conditions as erysipelatous inflammations and phlegmons.

callus

[′kal·əs]
(botany)
A thickened callose deposit on sieve plates.
A hard tissue that forms over a damaged plant surface.
(medicine)
Hard, thick area on the surface of the skin.

callus

1. an area of skin that is hard or thick, esp on the palm of the hand or sole of the foot, as from continual friction or pressure
2. an area of bony tissue formed during the healing of a fractured bone
3. Botany
a. a mass of hard protective tissue produced in woody plants at the site of an injury
b. an accumulation of callose in the sieve tubes
4. Biotechnology a mass of undifferentiated cells produced as the first stage in tissue culture
References in periodicals archive ?
Cold, callous and indescribably cruel,'' Judge Lazarus said of Lionel Tate's actions, contradicting his own words by describing said actions while confounding logic and humanity by writing off a child's entire life for ugly and destructive imitative behavior, the consequence of which he lacked the ability to comprehend.
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Murdering a police officer protecting and serving this community is as callous and cowardly an act as there is.
A MAN accused of murdering his father has a disorder which results in callous unconcern for the feelings of others, a court heard yesterday.
He should die because he took another human being's life in a brutal, callous and despicable manner, and for what, a stolen check for at most he would have done a couple of years in jail over,'' Deputy District Attorney Jeff Gootman said.
Grampian Police said: "This was an exceptionality callous and unprovoked attack on a vulnerable elderly man who is well known within Aberdeen Football Club.
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He said: "This was a particularly callous incident where a vulnerable elderly person has been targeted.
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