call

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call,

in finance, see: puts and callsputs and calls,
in securities trading. A call is a contract that gives the holder the right to purchase a given stock at a specific price within a designated period of time.
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call

[kȯl]
(computer science)
To transfer control to a specified closed subroutine.
A statement in a computer program that references a closed subroutine or program.

call

1. Hunting any of several notes or patterns of notes, blown on a hunting horn as a signal
2. Hunting
a. an imitation of the characteristic cry of a wild animal or bird to lure it to the hunter
b. an instrument for producing such an imitation
3. Brit the summons to the bar of a student member of an Inn of Court
4. Theatre a notice to actors informing them of times of rehearsals
5. (in square dancing) an instruction to execute new figures
6. Commerce
a. a demand for repayment of a loan
b. (as modifier): call money
7. Billiards a demand to an opponent to say what kind of shot he will play
8. Poker a demand for a hand or hands to be exposed
9. Bridge a bid, or a player's turn to bid
10. Sport a decision of an umpire or referee regarding a shot, pitch, etc.
11. Business on call
a. (of a loan, etc.) repayable on demand
b. available to be called for work outside normal working hours

call

(1) In programming, a statement that requests services from another subroutine or program. The call is physically made to the subroutine by a branch instruction or some other linking method that is created by the assembler, compiler or interpreter. The routine that is called is responsible for returning control to the calling program after it has finished processing. See stack.

(2) In communications, the action taken by the transmitting station to establish a connection with the receiving station in a dial-up network.
References in classic literature ?
asked Beth, a few weeks after that eventful call of his.
It was these same impulses, leading so invariably to success, that made his enemies call him the Wisest Man.
Why, what we thought was pure and simple mud is what they call 'gold-bearing cement.
And as for myself, you see what I am,--a dismal and lonesome old woman (for I begin to call myself old, Phoebe), whose temper, I am afraid, is none of the best, and whose spirits are as bad as can be I cannot make your life pleasant, Cousin Phoebe, neither can I so much as give you bread to eat.
Why, know you not," cried the shipmaster, "that this physician here -- Chillingworth he calls himself -- is minded to try my cabin-fare with you?
We were too far apart to call to each other, but there was a moment at which, at shorter range, some challenge between us, breaking the hush, would have been the right result of our straight mutual stare.
But now when the boatswain calls all hands to lighten her; when boxes, bales, and jars are clattering overboard; when the wind is shrieking, and the men are yelling, and every plank thunders with trampling feet right over Jonah's head; in all this raging tumult, Jonah sleeps his hideous sleep.
Suddenly some of the steam begins to advance, and, peering through it, you discern Aunt Elizabeth, Ona's stepmother--Teta Elzbieta, as they call her--bearing aloft a great platter of stewed duck.
Emerson, he will call, I shall call; you or your son will return our calls before ten days have elapsed.
The "calls" to preach, I am glad to say, are not nearly so numerous now as they were formerly, and the calls to some industrial occupation are growing more numerous.
When David shed his curls at the hair-dresser's, I am told, he said good-bye to them without a tremor, though Mary has never been quite the same bright creature since, so he despises the sheep as they run from their shearer and calls out tauntingly, "Cowardy, cowardy custard
491 d: And the author of "The Astronomy", which is attributed forsooth to Hesiod, always calls them (the Pleiades) Peleiades: `but mortals call them Peleiades'; and again, `the stormy Peleiades go down'; and again, `then the Peleiades hide away.