callus

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callus:

see corns and callusescorns and calluses,
thickenings of the outer layer of skin where there is irritation or constant pressure. Corns are cone-shaped with their points protruding into the dermis, or inner layer of skin. They usually have hard, shiny surfaces surrounded by red, painful areas.
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Callus

 

(1) Tissue formed in plants on the surface of a wound (cracks, taps, the bases of cuttings, and areas of concrescence of stock and scion). A callus promotes the healing of wounds. Consisting of thin-walled parenchymal cells, a callus develops when there is cell division of any living tissue of the plant (cambium or phloem) in the peripheral zone of the pith, lying next to the protoxylem. Adventitious roots and buds, particularly with grafting, often develop in the callus. (2) Corpus callosum, an accumulation of callóse that obstructs the sieve plate when the sieve tubes of the phloem age. Use of the term in this sense is obsolete.


Callus

 

a thickening of the horny layer of skin as a result of constant pressure or friction. Calluses usually appear on the palms, soles, and other parts of the body that are in constant contact with tough surfaces. The cracks formed on the surface of a callus may hinder one’s ability to work, and they can also be portals of entry for pyogenic microbes, resulting in such conditions as erysipelatous inflammations and phlegmons.

callus

[′kal·əs]
(botany)
A thickened callose deposit on sieve plates.
A hard tissue that forms over a damaged plant surface.
(medicine)
Hard, thick area on the surface of the skin.

callus

1. an area of skin that is hard or thick, esp on the palm of the hand or sole of the foot, as from continual friction or pressure
2. an area of bony tissue formed during the healing of a fractured bone
3. Botany
a. a mass of hard protective tissue produced in woody plants at the site of an injury
b. an accumulation of callose in the sieve tubes
4. Biotechnology a mass of undifferentiated cells produced as the first stage in tissue culture
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the various auxins tested IBA at different concentrations induced rapid, maximum callusing percentage, healthiest invariably greener and more granular callus from leaf explant compared to IAA, NAA and 2, 4-D when supplied at the same concentrations.
Auxin at different concentrations when supplied in combination with BAP (Table 1) did not induced any significant increases in callusing percentage or degree of callusing when compared to auxin alone.
When the basal media was supplied with 10g/l of sucrose the percentage of leaves callused, the degree of callusing and induced callus appearance were significantly better than at 20 or 30g sucrose in both half and full MS basal medium strengths.
However, the callusing percentage, degree of callusing and callus appearance were dependent on auxin type and concentration.