calyx

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calyx

(kā`lĭks): see sepalsepal,
a modified leaf, part of the outermost of the four groups of flower parts. The sepals of a flower are collectively called the calyx and act as a protective covering of the inner flower parts in the bud. Sepals are usually green, but in some flowers (e.g.
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.

Calyx

 

the aggregate of usually green outer leaflets, or sepals, surrounding the corolla in flowers having a double perianth. The sepals are separate or fused.

The biological purpose of the calyx is to protect the flower’s internal organs and the developing fruit and to ensure supplementary feeding. In a few plants (Hydrangea, Erica, and some Ranunculaceae) the calyx is large and brightly colored and serves, instead of a corolla (which is either absent or underdeveloped), to attract insects. In some plants (Papaver) the calyx falls off when the flower opens; in others (Ranunculus) it falls off after the completion of flowering. In the majority of plants, however, the calyx remains after flowering and may even proliferate and participate in fruit formation. In Umbelliferae, Compositae, and some other plants the calyx is completely reduced or converted into hairs.

calyx

[′kā‚liks]
(botany)
The outermost whorl of a flower; composed of sepals.
(engineering)
A steel tube that is a guide rod and is also used to catch cuttings from a drill rod. Also known as bucket; sludge barrel; sludge bucket.
(invertebrate zoology)
A cup-shaped structure to which the arms are attached in crinoids.
(medicine)
A cuplike structure.
In the kidney, a collecting structure extending from the renal pelvis.

calyx

An ornament resembling the outer protective covering of a flower; found, for example, in the Corinthian capital.

calyx

1. the sepals of a flower collectively, forming the outer floral envelope that protects the developing flower bud
2. any cup-shaped cavity or structure, esp any of the divisions of the human kidney (renal calyx) that form the renal pelvis
References in periodicals archive ?
Among sowing dates, maximum calyces yield was obtained from the plants sown on 6th May.
It is obvious that if plant density affects growth parameters such as leaves, which are the main source of producing photosynthates, the calyces production will be affected as a consequence.
The variation in number of calyces per plant due to the planting densities can be attributed to the fact that at higher planting densities the competition for food, water and light increases, which results in lesser number of calyces compared to those produced by plants grown at lower densities.
Thus, the increase in calyces weight per plant was due to more assimilates partitioned into the fruits (Ameri et al.
There was a substantial effect of both sowing time and planting density on the calyces yield per ha.
Though the lowest plant density (2 plants m-2) produced more leaves and calyces per plant, the production per ha (per unit area) was the lowest.
Single colonies grown on slides always consisted of calyces of only one sex.
Colonies grown on glass slides and kept in jars of seawater in the laboratory under various food, water flow, and temperature levels (as part of growth experiments unrelated to the present study) also contained calyces of only a single sex, and did not change sex over the course of the three-month experiments.
Aggregations of calyces of these species always consisted mainly or entirely of one sex [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURES 3B, 3C OMITTED].
Each of the 21 slide-grown colonies from Lake Merritt consisted of calyces of a single sex, although colonies did not contain very many sexually mature calyces [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3D OMITTED].
In June 1995, when the slide-grown colonies first became sexually mature, only male (and immature) calyces were present.
The pungent fragrance of some calyces probably results from a bouquet including alpha pinene, beta pinene, and other terpenes.