Calypso

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Calypso,

in astronomy, one of the named moons, or natural satellites, of SaturnSaturn,
in astronomy, 6th planet from the sun. Astronomical and Physical Characteristics of Saturn

Saturn's orbit lies between those of Jupiter and Uranus; its mean distance from the sun is c.886 million mi (1.
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. Also known as Saturn XIV (or S14), Calypso is a small, irregularly shaped (nonspherical) body measuring about 21 mi (34 km) by 13.5 mi (22 km) by 13.5 mi (22 km); it orbits Saturn at a mean distance of 183,093 mi (294,660 km), and has an orbital period of 1.8878 earth days—the rotational period is unknown but is assumed to be the same as the orbital period. Calypso was discovered in 1980 by a group led by a team at the Univ. of Arizona led by Bradford A. Smith from ground-based photographs taken with prototype cameras designed for the Hubble Space Telescope. Calypso is co-orbital with two other moons, TelestoTelesto
, in astronomy, one of the named moons, or natural satellites, of Saturn. Also known as Saturn XIII (or S13), Telesto is an irregularly shaped (nonspherical) body measuring about 21 mi (34 km) by 17 mi (28 km) by 16 mi (26 km); it orbits Saturn at a mean distance of
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 and TethysTethys
, in astronomy, one of the named moons, or natural satellites, of Saturn. Also known as Saturn III (or S3), Tethys is 659 mi (1060 km) in diameter, orbits Saturn at a mean distance of 183,093 mi (294,660 km), and has equal orbital and rotational periods of 1.
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; that is, they orbit Saturn at the same distance. Calypso and Telesto are two of the smallest moons in the solar system.

calypso,

a form of folk song developed on the island of Trinidad and also popular in other Caribbean countries. Thought to have begun with 19th-century black slaves, calypso songs developed and continue to be used in the traditional pre-Lenten carnivalcarnival,
communal celebration, especially the religious celebration in Catholic countries that takes place just before Lent. Since early times carnivals have been accompanied by parades, masquerades, pageants, and other forms of revelry that had their origins in pre-Christian
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. Drawing mainly on both African and European sources, the music uses varieties of some 50 traditional melodies and employs a ballad form in either 2/4 or 4/4 time with syncopated phrasing. Orchestration often includes drums, guitars, maracas, brass and wind instruments, and, since they developed in the mid-1940s, steel drums (originally modified oil drums). At first sung in a Creole French, calypso has been performed in a lilting patois-tinged English by colorfully named artists since the early 20th cent. Frequently improvised, lyrics are witty, mocking, colloquial, and topical, usually addressing current events or concerns. Calypso traveled outside Trinidad in the 1920s and 30s and, in a highly commercialized form, became very popular in the United States during the late 1940s and 1950s. Probably the most famous of the many 20th-century calypso artists are, in Trinidad, the Mighty Sparrow, and, in the United States, Harry Belafonte.

Bibliography

See studies by K. Q. Warner (1982, repr. 1999), D. R. Hill (1993), L. Regis (1998), and J. Cowley (1999).


Calypso

(kəlĭp`sō), nymph, daughter of Atlas, in Homer's Odyssey. She lived on the island of Ogygia and there entertained Odysseus for seven years. Although she offered to make him immortal if he would remain, Odysseus spurned the offer and continued his journey.

Calypso

(kă-lip -soh) A small irregularly shaped satellite of Saturn, discovered in 1980. It is a coorbital satellite with Telesto and Tethys. See Table 2, backmatter.

Calypso

 

a French oceanographic vessel. Built in 1942, the Calypso operates under programs of the Ministry of National Education and the Geographic Society of France. The vessel is 47 m long, 7.7 m wide, and displaces 360 tons. Its free cruising range is 5,000 nautical miles (9,260 km); it has a crew of 12 and ten scientific workers. The vessel is equipped with oceanographic winches and has special gear for underwater research and television and motion-picture filming. In 1967, under the command of J.-Y. Cousteau, the Calypso began research operations in the tropical seas of the world.

Calypso

[kə′lip·sō]
(astronomy)
A small, irregularly shaped satellite of Saturn that librates about the leading Lagrangian point of Tethys's orbit.

Calypso

promises Odysseus eternal youth and immortality if he will stay with her forever. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 166]

calypso

1
1. a popular type of satirical, usually topical, West Indian ballad, esp from Trinidad, usually extemporized to a percussive syncopated accompaniment
2. a dance done to the rhythm of this song

calypso

2
a rare N temperate orchid, Calypso (or Cytherea) bulbosa, whose flower is pink or white with purple and yellow markings
References in periodicals archive ?
After writing the song "Mary, I Am Tired and Disgusted," which achieved great popularity in Port of Spain during World War II, the young composer and singer was dubbed Lord Kitchener by fellow calypsonian Growling Tiger, after the famous British military officer and statesman.
The calypsonian, as a practitioner of the style is called, counted among his most fervent fans such high-profile figures as England's Princess Margaret and U.
Chalkdust, who had completed a first degree in History at UWI during the 1970s (and would later go on to receive a doctorate in history), was not only impacted by the ferment of the times but in fact would form part of a number of calypsonians who would be the leading singers of the new historical sensibilities.
The resurgence of black pride with its focus on Africa provided an opportunity for calypsonians to reassert themselves as griots in the sense that they understood the role of the African griot to be--that is, not merely as storyteller or validator of the ruling elite but as the people's historians.
A phalanx of calypsonians used their compositional skills and their considerable stage presence to drum out this Afro-centric message and to undermine the popularity of the Creole Nationalist vision with its de-emphasis of Africa.
Most calypsonians are not the generators of original ideas.
Many of these calypsonians were born in the 1940s and therefore experienced colonialism and the rise of the PNM as the anti-colonial movement as children.
On more than one occasion he indicated that he was quite aware of what the calypsonians were saying about him and his regime.
He embraced some calypsonians and was even known to be personally financially generous to others.
The marriage between the nationalist movement and the calypsonians was not long in duration.
For example, the school principal Pete Simon, who was an unapologetic supporter of the PNM, was a known confidant of calypsonians and often a ghostwriter; later, as a civil servant working as Chief Youth Officer in the Division of Community Development, Pete Simon would openly compose for calypsonian Prince Valiant, and Simon himself sang calypsos as Jaguar.
He, like the calypsonians of the 1930s and 1940s, had gone to the metropolitan societies and had tamed if not conquered their putative overlords; he in scholarly endeavours and they, at least in their imaginative forays, in the sexual arena.