camber

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camber

1. another name for bank
2. Engineering an outward inclination of the front wheels of a road vehicle so that they are slightly closer together at the bottom than at the top
3. Aeronautics aerofoil curvature expressed by the ratio of the maximum height of the aerofoil mean line to its chord

Camber

A slightly convex curvature intentionally built into a beam, girder, or truss to compensate for an anticipated deflection so that it will not sag under load; any curved surface designed to facilitate runoff water.

Camber

 

in automobiles, the positioning of the wheels at an angle to the vertical plane, causing the spacing between the top of the wheels to be greater than that between the bottom. Camber makes it possible to avoid the inward tilt of the wheels as the automobile moves; this tilt can be caused by the flexing of the front axle under a load and also by the existence of play in the bushings of the kingpins and wheel bearings. Camber in the front wheels facilitates steering.


Camber

 

a slight convexity given to structural members (beams, trusses) to improve their performance and architectural qualities. The camber ensures that structural members will attain the designed shape and not sag when subjected to loads that cause elastic strains and flex connections and angle joints. The amount of camber is determined by the dimensions of the structural member, the elasticity of the materials, and the kind of load. It is usually taken into consideration during the fabrication of a structural member by suitable alterations of design, but in many cases it is accomplished by prestressing the member.

camber

[′kam·bər]
(aerospace engineering)
The rise of the curve of an airfoil section, usually expressed as the ratio of the departure of the curve from a straight line joining the extremities of the curve to the length of this straight line.
(design engineering)
Deviation from a straight line; the term is applied to a convex, edgewise sweep or curve, or to the increase in diameter at the center of rolled materials.
(geology)
A terminal, convex shoulder of the continental shelf.
A structural feature that is caused by plastic clay beneath a bed flowing toward a valley so that the bed sags downward and seems to be draped over the sides of the valley.
(naval architecture)

camber

1. A slight convex curvature built into a truss or beam to compensate for any anticipated deflection so that it will have no sag when under load. Also see bow.
2. A slight convex curvature of any surface, e.g., to facilitate the runoff of water.

camber

camberclick for a larger image
i. The curvature of an airfoil above and below the chord-line surface. It is the distance between the mean camber line and the chord line. Where the mean camber line lies above the chord line, the airfoil is said to have a positive camber. Maximum camber is a ratio of maximum distance between the camber line to the chord length. Camber is generally confused with the thickness of the airfoil, which is the greatest distance between the upper and lower surfaces of the airfoil.
ii. The angle of the wheels of an aircraft from vertical. If the wheels are tilted outward, the camber is positive, and if they are tilted inward, the camber is negative. See negative camber ii.
References in periodicals archive ?
The NASCAR[c] race car with its 6+[degrees] LF camber had some of the lowest variation in the whole test.
For this research, a full vehicle alignment measurement included camber and toe-in for the left front (LF), RF, LR, and RR wheels.
We think highways engineers need to review this work urgently to assess these safety concerns and identify whether further physical modification of the road is needed, whether in terms of re-profiling of the camber, reduction of speed, or better signage.
After an introductory chapter defining the terms of his analysis and outlining the vast historiographies he is working within, Cambers then moves spatially from the most private spaces for devotional reading outwards to the most public.
The airfoil modification method consists of symmetrically adding thickness to an airfoil in such a way that the "nose" geometry, airfoil thickness and camber remain the same, but obtaining a blunt trailing edge.
From left, Phil > Cambers, commercial director, Russell Henderson, technical director, Paul Watson, managing director, and Paul Rutherford, operations director
The new building is a statement of faith in our business," said Cambers.
Camber said: "When we started, forecasters such as Gartner said that virtualisation was going to be massive, but people were asking whether we should be focusing on just that one thing.
Cambers said: "It's very important for businesses at the moment because they're looking to save money and be more productive.
GREEN Phil Cambers of SITS Group and Ian Blake, Port of Tyne
Mr Cambers said: "While other more generalised IT solutions providers are jumping on the bandwagon we are the North East's only specialist in this technology and we intend to capture a big slice of the market.
Today, Camber boasts more than 80 associates, 85,000 square feet of