camera lucida


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camera lucida

[¦kam·rə ′lü·səd·ə]
(optics)
An instrument having a peculiarly shaped prism or a system of mirrors, and often a microscope, which causes a virtual image of an object to be produced on a plane surface, enabling the image's outline to be traced.
References in periodicals archive ?
Black and Blue is an important book for its deft analyses of the memory- and photography- focused works, Barthes' Camera Lucida, Chris Marker's La Jetee and Sans soleil, and Alain Resnais and Marguerite Duras' Hiroshima mon amour, ft is a compelling work for Mavor's ability to trace an unexpected path among many "bruising" works and for the invitation she offers readers into her own intimate experiences with these texts.
Dendritic branching was quantified from camera lucida drawings of the soma and basilar dendritic arbor of six to seven CA1 pyramidal neurons randomly selected from each of five to seven brains per treatment group.
In retrospect, Camera Lucida was not the act of heresy that it was taken to be.
It may be modesty which precludes Sontag from pointing out that touch is one of the central tenets of Barthes's approach to photography in Camera Lucida, and that it is an idea which he has taken from her.
The camera lucida was a clever new gadget, invented only in 1807 by an English doctor and scientist, William Hugh Wollaston.
IN CAMERA LUCIDA, ROLAND BARTHES' REFLECtion on the relationship between photography and mortality, the author writes:
I will then devote my attention to Roland Barthes' Camera Lucida (1981), a book I like to situate on my syllabus as a sequel to Bazin's writings.
Camera Lucida reconstruction of the morphology of biocytin-filled cells indicated that these interneurons had axonal arbors that were located primarily in stratum lacunosum-moleculare and stratum radiatum.
Mandibles described were removed from mature larvae and exuviae and examined with a Wilde (M-5) equipped with a camera lucida and a Meiji (ML2000) microscope.
The most common tool, he argues, was long the camera lucida, a small device that threw an image from life directly onto a canvas.
Readers may be forgiven for shrieking over such passages (Barthes on his egghunt is a constant presence throughout this book; even the dreaminess of his syntax in Camera Lucida is evoked by Mavor's elliptical pronouncements), but Mavor's insistence on the very personal nature of encountering photography, be it in the public collection or private drawer, is in fact important simply because it is so rarely confronted and so hard to articulate, and in her work she offers an original and frequently more stimulating account of our exchanges with the medium than more obviously politicized readings by critics such as John Tagg or Victor Burgin or John Berger.
He was followed in 1834 by Alexander Blair and Sir Francis Ronalds (inventor of the electric telegraph), who amplified Bathurst Deane's map and took views with the aid of a camera lucida, publishing their work privately in 1836.