camera obscura


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to camera obscura: camera lucida

camera obscura

a darkened chamber or small building in which images of outside objects are projected onto a flat surface by a convex lens in an aperture

camera obscura

[¦kam·rə əb′skyu̇r·ə]
(optics)
A primitive camera in which the real image of an object can be observed or traced on the wall of the enclosure opposite the aperture, rather than being recorded photographically.
References in periodicals archive ?
The real thing in this case - the camera obscura, which is Latin for "darkened room" - turns out to be a wigwam-shaped swirl of Douglas fir veneer scraps donated by Rosboro Lumber Co.
Two 18th-century examples of the camera obscura will be on display, providing an opportunity for visitors to learn more about this scientific tool.
Table 4 Means and Standard Deviations (SD) of Combined Aesthetic Evaluations for Camera Obscura and Non-Camera Obscura Conditions in Experiment 2 Painting title Condition Mean SD Girl Interrupted at Her Music Camera Obscura 3.
The room-sized camera obscura ("dark chamber"), which the viewer enters to observe the image, was a site of wonder, curiosity, research and entertainment in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe.
The band are now signed to oh-so-cool Spanish indie label Elefant records, home to Camera Obscura, and they have released two critically acclaimed singles to date.
I am collaborating on A Walk Between Two Worlds with Dao Anh Khanh of Hanoi (see "New York Notebook," page 28) and a camera obscura installation (Revealed).
A camera obscura is like a simple camera with a mirror in it but no film (photographic film had not yet been invented).
For this one, I got information about the market of painting in 17th-century Holland and the Camera Obscura.
Concerning the question of optical aids, there is a possible answer well short of the use of lenses, mirrors, or a pinhole camera obscura.
Other instances of western imports that may have altered Japanese perceptions include the optique, a kind of camera obscura, whose effects can be traced in certain prints and in books on geography and natural history.
The literal translation of camera obscura from Latin is "room dark" (camera = room; obscura = dark).