canard


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canard

an aircraft in which the tailplane is mounted in front of the wing

canard

[kə′närd]
(aerospace engineering)
An aerodynamic vehicle in which horizontal surfaces used for trim and control are forward of the wing or main lifting surface.
The horizontal trim and control surfaces in such an arrangement.

canard

canard
A horizontal stabilizing and control surface or fore-plane located forward of the wing. It can act as a trimmer or like a conventional tailplane. A canard may be fixed, movable, or have a variable geometry.
References in periodicals archive ?
A canard is a solution of singularly perturbed dynamical system (1) following the attracting branch [M.
Nesse caso, considerando apenas os exemplares que chegaram ate nos, temos no minimo um titulo de canard por mes nos primeiros trinta anos do seculo XVII.
Takeoff procedure for all of the Peterson canard mods is to select 20 degrees of flaps, set normal takeoff trim and apply full power.
Singhvi said it was lamentable that such canards were being spread about a CD, which has, in fact, been accepted thrice over to be 'fabricated and morphed'.
compiler of The Amazing Benjamin Franklin, who labeled the canard a "libel of the Jewish race, unjust both to Jews and to the name and fame of Benjamin Franklin.
3m-long canard wings has to be absolute and, consequently, they each undergo exhaustive nondestructive testing (NDT).
Cragin, at times, seems to suggest that the canards operated in this second fashion, but he delivers little concrete evidence of the self-consciousness of the cultural resistance he sees at work here ("successful resistance," 220).
The group's Web site promotes the Religious Right canard of America as a Christian nation.
Henderson even buys the canard that the Caruses' efforts to promote "high culture" were doomed by mass enrollments, as though it were an obvious truth that the children of the poor could never appreciate classic fairy tales and myths, a rather questionable assumption.
Otherwise, it recycles the canard that the Near East is populated not by civilians but by radicals perpetually on the brink of becoming even more radicalized.
It was, therefore, disappointing to see him repeat that old canard that Hillary Clinton had looted the White House.
For this reviewer, Smith's least satisfying chapter is the one in which he argues that the obsession of many French intellectuals with the effects of globalization is nothing more than an ideologically-driven canard.