canary


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Related to canary: Domestic Canary

canary

(kənâr`ē), common name for a familiar cage bird of the family Ploceidae (Old World finchfinch,
common name for members of the Fringillidae, the largest family of birds (including over half the known species), found in most parts of the world except Australia.
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 family), descended from either the wild serin finch or from the very similar wild canary, Serinus canarius, of the Canary Islands, Madeira, and the Azores and introduced into Europe in the late 15th or early 16th cent. The wild birds are usually gray or green; selective breeding has produced both plain and variegated birds, mostly yellow and buff but sometimes greenish. Germany is traditionally the center for training and breeding canaries; the Harz Mt. and the St. Andreasberg canaries originated there. The birds are trained to sing by exposure to other birds of superior ability or to musical instruments. The song of roller canaries is a series of "tours," a complex set of rolling trills delivered with the bill almost closed; choppers sing with the bill open. Canaries breed rapidly in captivity and with proper care may live to 15 years or more. Canaries are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Ploceidae.

Canary

 

(Serinus canaria), a bird of the family Fringillidae of the order Passeriformes. The canary has a body length measuring 12–14 cm. The male has a yellowish green back with dark streaks and a yellow breast and throat; the female’s plumage is greenish. The bird is widely distributed on the Madeira Islands, the Azores, and the Canary Islands (hence the name). It was brought to Europe and domesticated in the 16th century; it multiplies readily in captivity. Many varieties have been bred, differing in appearance and song; for this reason the birds are popular as pets, kept in cages.

Similar to the canary is the serin (S. serinus), which is sometimes considered to be only a subspecies of canary. The serin is distributed in northwest Africa, in Asia Minor, on the Arabian Peninsula, and in Europe (except northern Europe). It lives in the USSR in the western European areas.

The canary settles in gardens and parks, nesting in trees. The female lays three to five eggs and incubates them for 13 days. The bird feeds mainly on seeds.

REFERENCE

Lukina, E. V. Pevchie i tsvetnye kanareiki. Moscow, 1966.

canary

An expression used in lieu of squawk in some countries. The prefixes sing and strangle are used in lieu of orders for putting the IFF (identification friend or foe) on and off, respectively.

canary

a small finch, Serinus canaria, of the Canary Islands and Azores: a popular cagebird noted for its singing. Wild canaries are streaked yellow and brown, but most domestic breeds are pure yellow
References in classic literature ?
Helena, and at some of the Canary islands, almost entire sterility.
The copying-clerk, or, as the lady said, the brown field-bird, was put into a small cage, close to the Canary, and not far from "my good Polly.
said the former inhabitant of the Canary Isles, continuing his dithyrambic.
O warm spicy land of my birth," sang the Canary bird; "I will sing of thy dark-green bowers, of the calm bays where the pendent boughs kiss the surface of the water; I will sing of the rejoicing of all my brothers and sisters where the cactus grows in wanton luxuriance.
The frightened Canary fluttered about in his cage; the Parrot flapped his wings, and cried, "Come, let us be men
Baroness Shilton, a friend of Petritsky's, with a rosy little face and flaxen hair, resplendent in a lilac satin gown, and filling the whole room, like a canary, with her Parisian chatter, sat at the round table making coffee.
The first was this: our ship making her course towards the Canary Islands, or rather between those islands and the African shore, was surprised in the grey of the morning by a Turkish rover of Sallee, who gave chase to us with all the sail she could make.
At one house near Moorfields, they found in one of the rooms some canary birds in cages, and these they cast into the fire alive.
While he was doing this, another man with an equally tender conscience (they had both been foremost in throwing down the canary birds for roasting alive), took his seat on the parapet of the house, and harangued the crowd from a pamphlet circulated by the Association, relative to the true principles of Christianity
From these Mr Venus rescues the canary in a glass case, and shows it to the boy.
Lest anybody should feel a curiosity to know how Kit was clad, it may be briefly remarked that he wore no livery, but was dressed in a coat of pepper-and-salt with waistcoat of canary colour, and nether garments of iron-grey; besides these glories, he shone in the lustre of a new pair of boots and an extremely stiff and shiny hat, which on being struck anywhere with the knuckles, sounded like a drum.
The complicated structure featuring a layer of shareholders in Songbird and another in Canary Wharf tended to leave Songbird trading at a discount to the value of its property and helped make it a takeover target, analysts say.