candelabrum

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candelabrum

(kăn'dəlä`brəm), primarily a support for candles, designed in the form of a turned baluster or a tapered column, also a branched candlestick or a lampstand. Though most used and developed during the Renaissance, the candelabrum originated in Etruria and Rome. Candelabra found in Etruscan and Pompeiian ruins are usually of bronze. From ancient Rome come the tall and monumental candelabra used in temples and public buildings. Of bronze or marble, they had triangular pedestals from which rose columnar shafts, finely sculptured and terminating at the top in a bowl used for holding illuminating oil and incense. With these as inspiration, Italian Renaissance artists produced superb candelabra in rich materials for altars, chapels, and processions. In that period the distinctive form of the candelabrum came also to be a ubiquitous decorative motive, used freely in architectural ornament, tapestry borders, stained-glass windows, and furniture. It was even converted (especially in Lombardy) into a definite architectural element, taking the place of a column or colonnette, as in windows of the Certosa at Pavia.

Bibliography

See F. W. Robins, The Story of the Lamp (and the Candle) (1939).

candelabrum

1. A movable candle lampstand with central shaft and, often, branches or a decorative representation thereof.
2. A lighting device designed as an architectural fixture, composed as in definition 1, above. Also see lamp post.
References in periodicals archive ?
MY personal favourite is this antique French three-arm candelabra with glass beaded droplets at pounds 36.
Candles are an obvious choice for winter, so to make sure your December is super stylish, opt for a stunning candelabra which can take pride of place in the centre of the table on Christmas Day.
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Pringle is keen on faux fur throws tossed over the sofa or bed, a stack of velvet pillows, and non-traditional chandeliers or candelabras made of iron with crystal beads or colored crystal drops.
All the rage now are retro props such as nautical spy glasses and sextants, Federal (round) mirrors, candles, candelabras, purple glass vases, pillows with gold tassels and anything Picasso-inspired.
The aid is coming in the form of menorahs - the traditional nine-candle candelabras - that are used during Hanukkah, the Festival of Light.
In an East Room grandly decorated in gold, with tall candelabras covered with fragrant roses, 232 guests selected for their corporate or political power dined in the knowledge that they were the A-list of A-lists.
Candelabras were hot until the '70s, when the fire marshal extinguished the practice for fear of fire.