trash

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trash

1. the dry remains of sugar cane after the juice has been extracted
2. bits that are broken or lopped off, esp the trimmings from trees or plants

trash

A mixture of highly combustible waste such as paper, cardboard cartons, wood boxes, and combustible floor sweepings; contains up to 10% by weight of plastic bags, coated paper, laminated paper, treated corrugated cardboard, oil rags, and plastic or rubber scraps; contains approx. 10% moisture, and approx. 5% incombustible solids. Also see garbage, refuse, and rubbish.

trash

To destroy, e.g. the contents of a data structure. The most common of the family of near-synonyms including mung, mangle, and scribble.

trash

(1) To delete a record or file on the computer.

(2) A trash receptacle simulated by an application or operating system that stores items deleted by the user. The receptacle is an interim holding place that lets users restore the item if needed. In order to completely "empty" the receptacle and save disk space, an "empty trash" or equivalent option must be selected by the user. See trash can and recycle bin.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study examined the effect of NT and/or green cane trash management on TOC stocks at four sugarcane trial sites in Queensland, Australia, to assess the potential of these management practices to increase soil carbon sequestration in sugarcane soils over 0-0.
Ng Kee Kwong KF, Deville J, Cavalot PC, Riviere V (1987) Value of cane trash in nitrogen nutrition of sugarcane.
Water quality will also be improved by wider adoption of management options such as trash blanket harvesting (retention of cane trash on fields after harvest), fallow crops rather than bare soil, minimum tillage, avoiding excessive fertiliser and incorporation of fertilisers into the soil to avoid direct run-off of surface-applied nutrients.
This kidney island, poor Ind, which half- slipped on sweets unwrapped, powered with cane trash, stayed discovery, waits insulin now turns its sweet to plenty turn to the clear inlet pain, filled with Arawak ghosts people a clear glaze, neither slave nor indentured, dead processors of sweets wired its virginity.
Burning hay stacks in England and smouldering cane trash in Jamaica seem to have little in common beyond the smoke they produce.