cane

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cane,

in botany, name for the hollow or woody, usually slender and jointed stems of plants (particularly rattanrattan
, name for a number of plants of the genera Calamus, Daemonorops, and Korthalsia climbing palms of tropical Asia, belonging to the family Palmae (palm family).
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 and other bamboos) and for various tall grasses, e.g., sugarcanesugarcane,
tall tropical perennials (species of Saccharum, chiefly S. officinarum) of the family Gramineae (grass family), probably cultivated in their native Asia from prehistoric times.
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, sorghum, and also other grasses used in the S United States for fodder. The large, or giant, cane (Arundinaria macrosperma or gigantea), a bamboobamboo,
plant of the family Gramineae (grass family), chiefly of warm or tropical regions, where it is sometimes an extremely important component of the vegetation. It is most abundant in the monsoon area of E Asia.
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 grass native to the United States, often forms impenetrable thickets 15 to 25 ft (3.6–7.6 m) high—the canebrakes of the South. The stalks are used locally for fishing poles and other purposes, and the young shoots are sometimes eaten as a potherb.

cane,

walking stick. Probably used first as a weapon, it gradually took on the symbolism of strength and power and eventually authority and social prestige. Ancient Egyptian rulers carried the symbolic staff, and in ancient Greece, some gods were represented with a staff in hand. In the Middle Ages, the long staff or walking stick was carried by pilgrims and shepherds. A scepter carried in the right hand symbolized royal power; carried in the left hand of a king the staff represented justice. The church, too, adopted the staff for its officials; the pastoral staff (crosier), which is long and has a crooked handle, symbolizes the bishop's office. The word cane was first applied to the walking stick after 1500, when bamboo was first used. After 1600 canes became highly fashionable for men. Made of ivory, ebony, and whalebone, as well as of wood, they had highly decorated and jeweled knob handles. They were often made hollow in order to carry possessions or supplies or, in some cases, to conceal a weapon. In the late 17th cent. oak sticks were extensively used, especially by the Puritans. The cane continued in men's fashions throughout the 18th cent.; as with the women's fan certain rules became standard for its use. From time to time women adopted the cane, particularly for a short time when Marie Antoinette carried the shepherd's crook. In the 19th cent. the cane became a mark of the professional man; the gold-headed cane was especially favored.

Bibliography

See K. Stein, Canes and Walking Sticks (1973).

What does it mean when you dream about a cane?

Male sexuality. Could also indicate weakness or, alternatively, something that supports us. “Caning” is also a form of punishment.

cane

[kān]
(botany)
A hollow, usually slender, jointed stem, such as in sugarcane or the bamboo grasses.
A stem growing directly from the base of the plant, as in most Rosaceae, such as blackberry and roses.

cane

1
1. 
a. the long jointed pithy or hollow flexible stem of the bamboo, rattan, or any similar plant
b. any plant having such a stem
2. the woody stem of a reed, young grapevine, blackberry, raspberry, or loganberry
3. any of several grasses with long stiff stems, esp Arundinaria gigantea of the southeastern US
4. See sugar cane

cane

2
Dialect a female weasel
References in periodicals archive ?
If the caning sentence is to be imposed, it is their duty to carry it out fairly," he added.
Kartika's father, Shukarno Mutalib, when contacted, said the family was happy to hear that the department was able to handle the caning.
London-based human rights watchdog Amnesty International on Wednesday urged Malaysia to end a caning "epidemic", saying the women's case was "just the tip of the iceberg".
Sisters in Islam, a local group of Muslim women activists, said the caning "constitutes further discrimination against Muslim women in Malaysia".