canned program

canned program

[¦kand ′prō·grəm]
(computer science)
A program which has been written to solve a particular problem, is available to users of a computer system, and is usually fixed in form and capable of little or no modification.

canned program

A software package that provides a fixed solution to a problem. Canned industry-oriented business applications must be analyzed carefully to determine their flexibility. See canned routine.
References in periodicals archive ?
All school districts are required to have teacher evaluation systems, but the South Lane district devised its own, with teachers' participation, rather than purchasing what Parent calls "a canned program.
Regardless of whether one is doing a custom or canned program, any program delivered electronically without hard media in the form of tangible personal property is not subject to tax.
The governor will have a canned program,'' predicted Rep.
Thus, users become capable of undertaking intellectually meaningful research--running tests that they choose for their own reasons, rather than following rote procedures of a canned program.
The intellectual discipline of constructing one's own models reinforces sound and careful research habits whereas reliance on canned programs forces nonintellectual activity and fosters sloppy habits.
The fact that this calculation is very complex has forced most economists to rely on canned programs.
This wasn't some canned program, where they said, 'Hey, this will work.
Many loyalty companies offer canned programs that can be customized to a client's needs, seeking to combine the best of these approaches.
After a few years, many practitioners move away from canned programs as they become more comfortable with what they are doing.
Frank Wykoff of Pomona College and editor of Economic Inquiry wrote a paper in july 1989 arguing that students are better served by using a programming language - he recommends APL - instead of canned programs in their introductory econometrics courses.