Cannoneer


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Cannoneer

 

in pre-Revolutionary Russia, a private in theartillery.

References in periodicals archive ?
He fought in the war as a British sailor and cannoneer for six years before he was seriously wounded during an engagement with a Dutch vessel.
The proviso on the copyright page of Tales reminds us that "The events and people described herein are fictitious"; however, this romp of a memoir takes place around the time that the critic Seymour Krim, in Views of a Nearsighted Cannoneer (1961), argued that novels "show a closer, more realistic, more explicitly truthful and personal view of existence" while "real life" veers toward fiction.
Give me the cups, And let the kettle to the trumpet speak, The trumpet to the cannoneer without, The cannons to the heavens, the heaven to earth, 'Now the King drinks to Hamlet.
Bill was a member of the "Greatest Generation" as he served during World War II in the 196th Artillery Field Unit of the United States Army as a cannoneer at the age of 19.
THAT EXPLAINS WHY YOUR CANNONEER IS A ONE-ARMED MAN.
Surveying the terrain with a common-sense eye - and subtracting in my mind the modern houses and landscaping - I couldn't help but wonder at the folly of the repeated Union charges, which caused one Confederate cannoneer to famously remark, "A chicken could not live on that field when we open on it.
Streeter was wounded in France while serving as a cannoneer with the Army's 89th Division, 340th Field Artillery.
Streeter was wounded in France while serving as a cannoneer with the US Army's 89th Division, 340th Field Artillery.
We follow the conflict in Georgia from 1780 (when 17-year-old William Hunter joins the Cannoneers under Sergeant Ash) to his dramatic escape.