canola oil

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canola oil

[kə′nōl·ə ‚ȯil]
(food engineering)
An edible vegetable oil derived from rapeseed that is low in saturated fatty acids (less than 7%), high in monosaturated fatty acids (60%), and high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (30%).
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With up to 3 million tonnes of raw canola seed currently exported from Australia annually, the project will increase the value adding of Victoria s canola crop.
VICTORY(TM) canola hybrids have been market leaders in Canada over the last decade and are grown and harvested in Canada and the U.
Some critics worry that most canola plants are now genetically engineered.
We know that olive oil has a good pedigree among clinicians but canola oil has a good pedigree too," researchers added.
While one was asked to consume test diet, a diet rich in canola oil and low-GL foods, the other group had a control diet, rich in whole-wheat products such as cereals, whole-wheat bread and brown rice.
His study found that those on the canola bread diet experienced both a reduction in blood glucose levels and a significant reduction in LDL, or "bad," cholesterol.
Effects of some agronomy factors on phenology stages, vegetative characters and incidence of Sclerotinia stem rot in two genotypes of canola in Gonbad area.
Jiangling brings visitors in intimate contact with the beautiful canola flowers, enhancing the interactive experience.
When 75% of the soil water was available for crop use at planting, the model indicated that six of the sites had more than a 70% probability of producing a canola seed yield of at least 400 kg (900 lbs) per acre.
By adopting the method wheat aphids will first attack on canola and mustard instead of wheat," he said adding the wheat friendly insects which growed on canola also played a vital role in eating wheat aphids.
The team then added this CROPGRO canola cropping systems model to the Root Zone Water Quality Model 2 (RZWQM2), which was developed at Fort Collins.
Over the next five years, $15 million in new research funding will be combined with industry contributions for a total of $20 million invested in canola research and innovation.