canonization

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canonization

(kăn'ənĭzā`shən), in the Roman Catholic Church, process by which a person is classified as a saintsaint
[O.Fr., from Latin sanctus=holy], in Christianity, a person who is recognized as worthy of veneration. Nature of Sainthood

In the Hebrew Scriptures God is "the Holy One" or "one who is holy" (Isa. 1.4; 5.19; 41.14). "His people share His holiness" (Ex.
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. It is now performed at Rome alone, although in the Middle Ages and earlier bishops elsewhere used to canonize. Beatification, by which a person is called blessed and his or her cult is approved, requires proof of a miracle through the candidate's intercession (unless the candidate for sainthood was martyred) and proof that the candidate's life was exemplary, and must precede canonization. A candidate for sainthood may be declared venerable before beatification if the person led an exemplary life. Canonization requires proof of at least one additional miracle (occurring after beatification) attributable to the saint.

Until 1983 the process of canonization was like a trial at which the saint was said to be defended by the church; a prosecutor was appointed to attack all evidence alleged in favor of canonization. The prosecutor was popularly called advocatus diaboli [devil's advocate], his opponent the advocatus Dei [God's advocate]. The process has now been streamlined, and the position of devil's advocate eliminated.

The first solemn canonization seems to have been that of St. Ulrich late in the 10th cent. The method of formal canonization was set by the enactments of Urban VIII that came into force in 1634. In the Orthodox Eastern Church, a synod of bishops within a self-governing church has the authority to canonize.

Canonization

 

in the Catholic and Orthodox churches the inclusion of some person in the list of saints. In Catholicism it is an act that has been strictly defined with respect to law and public worship. The church-wide method of canonization was introduced by Pope Alexander III during the second half of the 12th century and was fixed in 1200 by Innocent III; the right to canonize became the exclusive prerogative of the Roman popes. In implementing canonization the church always pursues political aims.

Orthodoxy does not have as strict a system of canonization as Catholicism. In Russia church-wide canonization was introduced in the 16th century and was placed under the tsar’s control; from the time of Peter I it was implemented by imperial decree upon the recommendation of the synod.

References in periodicals archive ?
While I am certain that Dorothy Day would want whatever money it takes to canonize her directed toward the poor, I can't wait for the holy cards.
And reverence for her extends across the world: Pope John Paul II had a profound respect for the Virgin of Guadalupe, and he came to Mexico to canonize Juan Diego in July 2002.
First, he said that steps taken by the Church to canonize or beatify well-known Jewish converts to Catholicism were unwelcome by Jews; second, he criticized the enthusiasm among Vatican officials for Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ; and, third, he argued that Jewish-Catholic dialogue should not be viewed too optimistically, saying, "The ideal is far from the reality" (Nat.
The priest criticized plans to canonize the founder of Opus Dei, Blessed Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer; Italian Capuchin Blessed Padre Pio, a noted confessor whose body was marked with the signs of the crucifixion; and Blessed Juan Diego, the Mexican Indian who saw Our Lady of Guadalupe (NCR, Dec.
The controversy was reignited as Pope John Paul II declared May 22 his intention to canonize Stein, who adopted the name Sr.
What then are we to say about the fact that Christianity honors martyrs--we canonize them--as does Islam?
I wonder if Pope John Paul is thinking along that line when he looks for some married saints, preferably couples, to canonize.