canopy


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Related to canopy: Truck Canopy

canopy

1. a rooflike covering over an altar, niche, etc.
2. a roofed structure serving as a sheltered passageway or area
3. the nylon or silk hemisphere that forms the supporting surface of a parachute
4. the transparent cover of an aircraft cockpit
5. the highest level of branches and foliage in a forest, formed by the crowns of the trees

Canopy

A decorative hood above a niche, pulpit, or stall; a covered area that extends from the wall of a building, protecting an enclosure.

Canopy

 

(protective arch), in mining, a structure that ensures safe stoping and separation of minerals from caved material. Canopies are classified according to design and function as protective shields, flexible canopies of the enclosing and partitioning types, and interlayer canopies.

The design of the protective shield and the techniques for mining thick, sharply sloping coal seams using such shields were proposed by the Soviet scientist N. A. Chinakal in 1935 and were used in the Kuznetsk Coal Basin (Kuzbas) in 1938. Sectional protective shields were widely used in the 1940’s and 1950’s. Protective shields make it possible to work the entire thickness of a seam at once. Elastic reinforced-concrete protective shields have the great strength necessary for working seams in excess of 7-10 m thick and can be used many times. The shield is made of reinforced-concrete beams or pipes; for beams longer than 6 m it is made in sections. It moves along the slope behind the advancing face by its own weight and the weight of the caved material when the pillars on which it rests along the periphery are undermined.

Flexible metal canopies were first used in the USSR in the late 1940’s for working thick seams in the Kuzbas. They were subsequently used as components in new systems for working coal seams. Beginning in the early 1960’s they were used for working metallic ore deposits. In the early 1970’s, metal canopies were replaced by polymeric types that provide greater strength and malleability, better suitability for erection, and resistance to corrosion. The flexible canopy is set on the installation level along the upper limit of the floor or subfloor to be worked and at the mediate roof.

Interlayer canopies are used as a stable support for the roof, and sometimes for a floor, when mineral deposits are mined by sluicing. They are made of a 0.3–0.6-m thick layer of rocks or minerals, and the bridging is made of concrete slabs, wood, or metal grids.

V. V. ZHUKOV

canopy

[′kan·ə·pē]
(aerospace engineering)
The umbrellalike part of a parachute which acts as its main supporting surface.
The overhead, transparent enclosure of an aircraft cockpit.
(forestry)
The uppermost branching and spreading layer of a forest.

canopy

1. A decorative hood above a niche, pulpit, choir stall, or the like.
2. A covered area which extends from the wall of a building, protecting an entrance or loading dock.
3. The collective term for the upper blanket of foliage on trees.

canopy

i. The transparent cover over the cockpit of an airplane—fixed, hinged, or sliding and sometimes jettisonable by power. It also protects the occupants from airstream. In pressurized aircraft, a canopy helps hold and maintain cockpit pressure.
ii. The umbrella-like fabric body of a parachute, which provides high air-drag when deployed. It is usually made of nylon and supports the parachutists or load during the descent. It is the main deployable body of a parachute.
References in classic literature ?
The wheeled chair had been drawn back under the canopy and Dickon had sat down on the grass and had just drawn out his pipe when Colin saw something he had not had time to notice before.
They are waiting outside with the canopy which your Majesty is wont to have borne over you in the procession,' announced the Master of the Ceremonies.
Look here, fool and dolt (for so I may call you, when you don't understand my words, and run away from good fortune), if I had said that my daughter was to throw herself down from a tower, or go roaming the world, as the Infanta Dona Urraca wanted to do, you would be right in not giving way to my will; but if in an instant, in less than the twinkling of an eye, I put the 'Don' and 'my lady' on her back, and take her out of the stubble, and place her under a canopy, on a dais, and on a couch, with more velvet cushions than all the Almohades of Morocco ever had in their family, why won't you consent and fall in with my wishes?
As I stood thus meditating, I turned my gaze from the landscape to the heavens where the myriad stars formed a gorgeous and fitting canopy for the wonders of the earthly scene.
Malbihn lay in a hammock beneath canopy before his tent.
The coiling uprush of smoke streamed across the sky, and through the rare tatters of that red canopy, remote as though they belonged to another universe, shone the little stars.
Over a species of altar, and beneath a canopy of blue velvet, surmounted by white and red plumes, was a full-length portrait of Anne of Austria, so perfect in its resemblance that D'Artagnan uttered a cry of surprise on beholding it.
It was ten o'clock at night; the branches of the great trees in the garden of the count's house stood out boldly against the azure canopy of heaven, which was studded with golden stars, but where the last fleeting clouds of a vanishing storm yet lingered.
The sea glittered brightly in the sun and was as smooth as a mirror, and so calm that they could scarcely distinguish its murmur; sparrows chirped joyfully and the immense canopy of heaven spread over it all.
At last the time arrived, and out in his barren garden, under a canopy of dark clouds, sat the Frost-King before the misty wall, behind which were heard low, sweet sounds, as of rustling trees and warbling birds.
The first person that struck him on his entrance was Aramis, planted near a great chair on castors, very large, covered with a canopy of tapestry, under which there moved, enveloped in a quilt of brocade, a little face, youngish, very merry, somewhat pallid, whilst its eyes never ceased to express a sentiment at once lively, intellectual, and amiable.
But this was surely the most magnificent seat that ever a king or an emperor reposed himself upon, all made of chased gold, studded with precious stones, with a cushion that looked like a soft heap of living roses, and overhung by a canopy of sunlight which Circe knew how to weave into drapery.