can

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Related to canst: cloyed

can

1. a shallow cylindrical metal container of varying size used for storing and handling film
2. in the can (of a film, piece of music, etc.) having been recorded, processed, edited, etc.

can

[kan]
(design engineering)
A cylindrical metal vessel or container, usually with an open top or a removable cover.
(nucleonics)

canvas

A closely woven cloth of cotton, hemp, or flax; sometimes adhered to a wall or deck to serve as a substrate for paint; used to cover roof decks that are walking surfaces or sun decks.

CAN

References in periodicals archive ?
And therefore, when thou canst not pitch thy affliction upon any particular sinne, yet make not thy selfe so just, as that thou make God unjust, whose Judgements may be unsearchable, but they cannot be unjust.
Whoe'er keeps me, let my heart be his guard; Thou canst not then use rigor in my jail.
He concluded with a bit of Shakespeare: "This above all: to thine own self be true, /And it must follow, as the night the day, /Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Polonius concludes with this familiar adage, "This above all: to thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.
And how canst thou have patience about things about which thy understanding is not complete?
Thou still unravished bride of quietness, Thou foster child of silence and slow time, Sylvan historian, who canst thus express A flowery tale more sweet than our rhyme: What leaf-fringed legend haunts about thy shape Of deities or mortals, or of both.
With stories emerging about the Bielskis varying wildly, an admonishment from William Shakespeare: "This above all: 'To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man'" (Hamlet, Act 1, Scene III).
Push not off from that isle, thou canst never return
This above all: to thine own self be true; And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man.
How canst thou thus for shame, Titania, Glance at my credit with Hippolyta, Knowing I know thy love to Theseus?
Let us consider Aaron's response to the Goth, who after hearing a litany of the Moor's violent deeds, asks, "What, canst thou say all this and never blush?