capability

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capability

[‚kāp·ə′bil·ə·dē]
(computer science)
A permission that is given to a user of a computing system in advance to access a particular object in the system in a particular way, and that the user can later present to a reference monitor as a prevalidated ticket to gain access.

capability

(operating system, security)
An operating system security or access control model where specific types of access to a specific object are granted by giving a process this data structure or token.

The token may be unforgeable (typically by using encryption or hardware "tagged" memory). Capabilities are used in OSes such as Hydra, KeyKOS, EROS, Chorus/Mix, and the Stanford V system. Similar to Kerberos, but in an OS context.

Compare access control list.

capability

In information security, an indicator (token, semaphore, etc.) that authorizes an access mode to an object such as a file or a device for a specific user or process. See also privilege.
References in classic literature ?
The result of these observations to an intelligent mind must be clearly this, that if it be possible at any rate to construct a federal government capable of regulating the common concerns and preserving the general tranquillity, it must be founded, as to the objects committed to its care, upon the reverse of the principle contended for by the opponents of the proposed Constitution.
Thence he could rise to fame, and make his mother happy, knowing at the same time that he was capable of faithfully loving his wife.
Now, if water is not absolutely incompressible, it is at least capable of very slight compression.
The most distinctive mark of substance appears to be that, while remaining numerically one and the same, it is capable of admitting contrary qualities.
Darcy's conduct in it less than infamous, was capable of a turn which must make him entirely blameless throughout the whole.
In the ideal state power will be given to the man with most knowledge of the good; in other states to the men who are most truly capable of achieving that end which the citizens have set themselves to pursue.
He was dexterous to make him comfortable, and he exercised a cunning of which I should never have thought him capable to induce him to take the medicines prescribed by the doctor.
Another will be found, no doubt, capable of pulling down Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois.
You are capable of honourable feelings still, and that's why I am talking to you so.
Moreover, Speranski, either because he appreciated the other's capacity or because he considered it necessary to win him to his side, showed off his dispassionate calm reasonableness before Prince Andrew and flattered him with that subtle flattery which goes hand in hand with self-assurance and consists in a tacit assumption that one's companion is the only man besides oneself capable of understanding the folly of the rest of mankind and the reasonableness and profundity of one's own ideas.
If Emily considered herself capable of contributing in this way to the completeness of his great work on "the ruined cities," she had only to apply to his bookseller in London, who would pay her the customary remuneration and give her every assistance of which she might stand in need.
On the other hand, let the guilty man or woman be a resolute and intelligent person, capable of setting his (or her) wits fairly against the wits of the police--in other words, let the mystery really

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