capacitance standard

capacitance standard

[kə′pas·ə·təns ‚stan·dərd]
(electricity)
References in periodicals archive ?
Nanoscale devices that manipulate single electrons of charge e with metrological accuracy are being used at NIST to develop new fundamental electrical standards, such as a capacitance standard based on counting electrons.
This work is a critical step in the development of the Electron-Counting Capacitance Standard (ECCS).
A team of NIST scientists in collaboration with an intern from the University of Maryland, has made two advances in the development of cryogenic capacitors for use with the Electron-Counting Capacitance Standard (ECCS).
For example, in the case of the capacitance standard, this problem means that the standard must be stopped every so often to retune the gate charges.
The development of a NIST prototype SET capacitance standard is described as proceeding along three pathways: (1) a transportable version of the prototype is being constructed for direct comparison with the calculable capacitor at NIST headquarters in Gaithersburg, MD; (2) a detailed uncertainty analysis of all aspects of the standard is being developed; and (3) an effort is under way to design an easy-to-use, robust and automated system with computer control of as many functions as possible.
The electron pump is a critical component of the new SET-based capacitance standard being developed and detailed modeling of the error mechanisms is a critical step to understanding and improving the performance of the pump.
NIST plans to transfer the frequency dependence data to the Farad Bank and other reference capacitance standards, so that in the near future, improved capacitance calibrations will be available from NIST for the entire audio frequency range.
Recent work at NIST has resulted in a factor of three decrease in the uncertainty for certain of the highest-level calibrations of fused-silica capacitance standards.