capacity


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

capacity

1. a measure of the electrical output of a piece of apparatus such as a motor, generator, or accumulator
2. Electronics a former name for capacitance
3. Computing
a. the number of words or characters that can be stored in a particular storage device
b. the range of numbers that can be processed in a register
4. the bit rate that a communication channel or other system can carry
5. legal competence

capacity

[kə′pas·əd·ē]
(analytical chemistry)
In chromatography, a measurement used in ion-exchange systems to express the adsorption ability of the ion-exchange materials.
(computer science)
(electricity)
(science and technology)
Volume, especially in reference to merchandise or containers thereof.

capacity

2. The volume contained in a vessel.
3. The maximum or minimum water flow obtainable under given conditions (e.g., specified conditions of pressure, temperature, and velocity).

capacity

As it pertains to airports, it is the ability of an airport to handle a given volume of traffic. It is a limit that cannot be exceeded without incurring an operational penalty.

capacity

(communications)
The maximum possible data transfer rate of a communications channel under ideal conditions. The total capacity of a channel may be shared between several independent data streams using some kind of multiplexing, in which case, each stream's data rate may be limited to a fixed fraction of the total capacity.

capacity

With regard to computer and information systems, capacity refers to the storage and transaction processing capability of computer systems, the network and/or the datacenter. See capacity on demand and storage capacity.
References in classic literature ?
They were documents, in short, not official, but of a private nature, or, at least, written in his private capacity, and apparently with his own hand.
They were not bound to regard with affection a thing that could not sympathise with one amongst them; a heterogeneous thing, opposed to them in temperament, in capacity, in propensities; a useless thing, incapable of serving their interest, or adding to their pleasure; a noxious thing, cherishing the germs of indignation at their treatment, of contempt of their judgment.
Edgar, you cannot doubt that she has a capacity for strong attachments, or she wouldn't have abandoned the elegancies, and comforts, and friends of her former home, to fix contentedly, in such a wilderness as this, with you.
Judging him by lightness of heart, strength of constitution, and capacity for enjoyment, he was no older than most men who have only turned thirty.
In his lay capacity, he persisted in sitting down in the damp to such an insane extent, that when his coat was taken off to be dried at the kitchen fire, the circumstantial evidence on his trousers would have hanged him if it had been a capital offence.
For this reason I should be glad were fortune soon to offer me some opportunity of making myself an emperor, so as to show my heart in doing good to my friends, particularly to this poor Sancho Panza, my squire, who is the best fellow in the world; and I would gladly give him a county I have promised him this ever so long, only that I am afraid he has not the capacity to govern his realm.
A spirit of faction, which is apt to mingle its poison in the deliberations of all bodies of men, will often hurry the persons of whom they are composed into improprieties and excesses, for which they would blush in a private capacity.
It is evident that no other form would be reconcilable with the genius of the people of America; with the fundamental principles of the Revolution; or with that honorable determination which animates every votary of freedom, to rest all our political experiments on the capacity of mankind for self-government.
Bad poets compose such pieces by their own fault, good poets, to please the players; for, as they write show pieces for competition, they stretch the plot beyond its capacity, and are often forced to break the natural continuity.
Here I, for instance, quite naturally want to live, in order to satisfy all my capacities for life, and not simply my capacity for reasoning, that is, not simply one twentieth of my capacity for life.
These things are calculated according to a man's CAPACITY.
This capacity is found nowhere else, though it might be maintained that a statement or opinion was an exception to the rule.

Full browser ?