Cape

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cape

a headland or promontory

Cape

the
1. the SW region of South Africa, in Western Cape province

Cape

 

the part of a shoreline that projects into a sea, lake, or river. It may be composed of bedrock or alluvium. In the latter case, capes are usually low and represent the tips of coastal aggradational forms.

cape

[kāp]
(geography)
A prominent point of land jutting into a body of water. Also known as head; headland; mull; naze; ness; point; promontory.
References in classic literature ?
He thinks the cape is his enemy," explained Maria Valenzuela.
said Maria Valenzuela, as the bull charged bravely and the capador eluded it with a fling of his cape.
He reflected on it a good deal during the day, and, running across Sigsbee, a fellow Cape Pleasanter, after dinner that night at the Sybarites' Club, he spoke of the matter to him.
She's going to spend the summer at Cape Pleasant, Archie tells me.
There was a kind of quiver in the poor old chap's voice when he said: "She is coming to Cape Pleasant," which told me more than any words could have done.
Gossett was an unpopular subject with members of the Cape Pleasant Golf Club.
The early stages of the Cape Pleasant golf tournament need no detailed description.
Margaret had arrived at Cape Pleasant on the previous evening, and he had arranged by telephone to meet her at the end of the board-walk, which was about a mile from the links, at one o'clock, supply her with lunch, and spend the afternoon with her on the water.
No such long ball had been driven on the Cape Pleasant links since their foundation.
In the European division of the world, we must look back to the tertiary epochs, to find a condition of things among the mammalia, resembling that now existing at the Cape of Good Hope.
We had very good weather, only excessively hot, all the way upon our own coast, till we came to the height of Cape St.
About the twelfth day, the weather abating a little, the master made an observation as well as he could, and found that he was in about eleven degrees north latitude, but that he was twenty-two degrees of longitude difference west from Cape St.