capillary action


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capillary action

[′kap·ə‚ler·ē ′ak·shən]
(fluid mechanics)

capillary action, capillarity

1.The movement of a liquid in the interstices of soil or other porous material, as a result of surface tension.
2. The phenomenon responsible for dry soil sucking up moisture above the ground water level. Also see capillary flow.
References in periodicals archive ?
This action helps prevent mineral deposits that may form and impede the wick's capillary action.
Capillary action coupled with gravity and air pressure differentials will permit water to be drawn into the fabric, whilst surface tension allows water to flow over it and kinetic energy will drive shattered raindrops into any openings, pores or fissures.
The central new idea comprises a sequential joint forming process, using self-assembly of nanoparticles, polymers and filler composite materials exploiting capillary action and chemical surface functionalisation: In other words, the formed joint reaches its outstanding properties by the very processing of the materials.
It is the leading company in the country for capillary action and national coverage, with more than 10,000 points of access to services.
Because, as the Popular Science article points out, despite the capillary action, the surface level of the soil in the pea-gravel bucket will dry out.
The oak cladding is essentially a rain screen, open jointed to allow air-flow and to avoid capillary action in rain.
Over a number of days, sun-induced capillary action draws out salty moisture from the garden which is absorbed by the loose dry soil.
As weather becomes hot and dry, this dust mulch atop the soil breaks the capillary action, preventing evaporation of soil moisture.
Since the capillary pressure is a suction force, the inlet flow rate with capillary action is larger than that without capillary action.
Capillary action pulls the water into drier soil in much the same way that a kerosene lantern draws fuel up a wick.
The device's cap, a small vial, is then touched to the droplet, drawing in a precise amount of blood using capillary action.
As the liquid condenses, capillary action forces kick in and transform the vertical nanotubes into the intricate three-dimensional structures.