capreolus


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capreolus

In an ancient timber roof, a brace or strut; a king post or tie beam.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rob Kneale of Quadrant Energy commented "The Capreolus data set played a key role in choosing the Roc-2 well location".
NR MNI Taxon NR % % Det A-J-I MNI % Bos/Bison 5 0,4 2,3 1-1-0 2 7,7 Equus 109 9,5 50,2 10-1-1 12 46,2 Cervus 14 1,2 6,5 1/0/0 1 3,8 Capreolus 3 0,3 1,4 0-0-1 1 3,8 Capra 72 6,3 33,2 4-1-1 6 23,1 Rupicapra 2 0,2 0,9 1/0/0 1 3,8 Sus 2 0,2 0,9 1/0/0 1 3,8 Vulpes 9 0,8 4,1 1/0/0 1 3,8 Meles 1 0,1 0,5 1/0/0 1 3,8 Carniv.
If Capreolus can find no way to defend the existence of irresolvable qualified moral dilemmas, then chances are a system like Thomas's simply did not have room for them.
En particular, diria que el estudio de Graciano, de Santo Tomas y de Capreolus es muy completo, mientras que hay otros autores como San Raimundo de Penyafort que han quedado algo marginados en el estudio y que convendria recuperarlos.
In Abramowitsch's book on Mammals the entry concerning Cervus capreolus, which in Hebrew he was referring to as the tsvi, makes the following statement about the horns (1862: 413-414):
The European roe deer, Capreolus capreolus, is a small deer species, but don't tell him that.
2 2,7 Bos primigenius 7 4,2 2 2,7 Equus caballus 29 17,3 26 34,7 Cervus elaphus 27 16,1 21 28,0 Capreolus capreolus 8 4,8 Capra pyrenaica 4 2,4 5 6,7 Rupicapra rupicapra 77 45,8 12 16,0 Sus scropha Ursus spelaeus 12 7,1 Pantera pardus 5 6,7 Lynx pardina 1 1,3 Felix silvestris 1 0,6 Vulpes vulpes Canis lupus Martes martes Carnivoro indet Lepussp 2 1,2 T.
elaphus de origen italiano, Capreolus capreolus (corzo) procedentes de Espana y de Italia, y Dama dama (gamo) procedentes, tambien, de Espana y de Italia.
As to cab the vehicle, Chambers Dictionary of Etymology cites its first appearance as 1826 in the early Disraeli novel Vivien Grey as a short form of cabriolet, a horse-drawn carriage, itself borrowed by Smollett in 1763 from French cabriolet, from cabriolet, caper or leap (because of its bouncy motion), ultimately deriving from the Latin for wild goat, capreolus.
This evolution is clearly visible in the work of Johannes Capreolus (to whom I return later): from the early Thomist school onwards, more and more scholars started to rely upon Aquinas.