capsaicin


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capsaicin

[kap′sā·ə·sən]
(organic chemistry)
C18H27O3N A toxic material extracted from capsicum.
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Capsaicin induces apoptosis and modulates MAPK signaling in human gastric cancer cells.
During the study, the mice were split into two groups and given capsaicin in their food.
Double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of capsaicin 8% patch (QUTENZATM) in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy: STEP Study.
Gastrointestinal absorption and metabolism of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin in rats.
Reduction In Concomitant Neuropathic Pain (Np) Medication Use After Treatment With The Capsaicin 8% Patch: A Retrospective Analysis.
You can find capsaicin in various forms in health food stores.
Patients were asked to use intranasal capsaicin to treat their headaches without the use of any additional medication and report on the effectiveness and tolerability of the medication and whether they would continue to use it for future headache episodes.
General Capsaicin Description, Composition, Information On Ingredients, Hazards Identification, Handling And Storage, Toxicological & Ecological Information, Transport Information
In tests on mice, researchers at the University of California's San Diego School of Uni Medicine found capsaicin stops a painsensing protein called TRPV1 from working.
When you roast the chiles, the capsaicin tends to spread throughout the flesh.
Holt's solution was to combine Capsaicin with various herb and plant extracts to provide the relief without the burning.
In the journal Nature, researchers from the University of California, San Francisco also speculated that the capsaicin receptor might be involved in chronic pain syndromes and other diseases.