capsaicin


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capsaicin

[kap′sā·ə·sən]
(organic chemistry)
C18H27O3N A toxic material extracted from capsicum.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Here's a handy tip: If your mouth is on fire when eating hot peppers, don't drink water to cool it off; that merely spreads the pain around your mouth because capsaicin is only slightly water-soluble.
Meta-analyses and systematic reviews have shown capsaicin is effective for various painful conditions, including peripheral diabetic neuropathy, OA, and PHN.
no-ist) capsaicin is actually a neurotoxin  and in large enough concentrations can cause seizures, heart attacks, and even death.
Although bell peppers are very popular and widely consumed, they have not always been considered or associated with health, maybe due to their minimal capsaicin content.
It works by targeting the capsaicin receptor (also known as TRPV1) to inactivate the nerve fibers transmitting pain signals to the brain a therapeutic effect that can last for months until the nerve fiber regenerates.
Capsaicin was found to reduce the activation of hepatic satellite cells (HSCs) in mice models, Khaleej Times reported.
Capsaicin induces apoptosis and modulates Mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling through activation of CASP3 and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Park et al.
Mice fed capsaicin were less likely to develop the cancer and their lifespans were 30 per cent longer.
A sweet pepper, that has no capsaicin at all, has a Scoville rating of zero, while hottest chili pepper like habaneros has a rating of 300,000 or more.
In fact, TRPV1 is often called the capsaicin receptor.
You can find gels, ointments, and lotions containing capsaicin in drugstores and on the Internet.