Carangidae

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Carangidae

[kə′ran·jə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of perciform fishes in the suborder Percoidei, including jacks, scads, and pompanos.
References in periodicals archive ?
The larvae and early juveniles of 28 species of carangids of the South Atlantic and Gulf coasts have been described with some detail (Goode, 1882; Starks, 1911; Ginsburg, 1952; Aprieto, 1974; Laroche et al.
There have been no previous studies on the ontogeny of orientation or of vertical distribution determined from in situ observations, and only one article has considered the development of swimming abilities of carangid larvae.
If observed courtship behavior is included, the spawning season for permit and horse-eye jacks is protracted from February through October, and the five other carangid species described in the present study spawned within this period.
Distribution and abundance of carangid fish larvae in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, 1971-1974.
The oldest carangid yet studied is the trevally, Caranx georgianus, reported to reach an age of 46 years (James, 1984).
2000), as well as for the smaller pelagic carangids (3 d, Clarke and Privitera, 1995), spotted seatrout (2-7 d, Brown-Peterson et al.
Carangid fish juveniles are commonly seen associated with floating and underwater objects, such as air tubes and vinyl bags, both in hatchery tanks and natural waters (Tachihara et al.
This interpretation is broadly corroborated by the Aitutaki faunal evidence where relatively large, deep-water fish, such as lutjanids and carangids, are more common early in time when angling is well-represented (Allen 1992a).
Along with large coastal sharks many other fish such as serranids, carangids, and other elasmobranchs are also caught and are either retained or discarded at sea.
Larvae collected during the survey represented 58 different families, of which engraulids, sciaenids, carangids, and clupeids were the most prominent.
Among the eight species that occurred only in 1991, seven are truly marine fishes: three carangids (Gunn, 1990) and one each, clupeid, scombrid, synodontid, and pegasid (Pietsch, 1978).