Carbon sink

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carbon sink

[′kär·bən ‚siŋk]
(geochemistry)
A reservoir that absorbs or takes up atmospheric carbon; for example, a forest or an ocean.

Carbon sink

The carbon reservoirs and conditions that take in and store more carbon (i.e., carbon sequestration) than they release.
References in periodicals archive ?
We've found a carbon sink in the most unlikely place," says Yan Li, an ecologist at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Urumqi.
The mangroves stem erosion of the shoreline, create a natural ecosystem where marine, land, avians and wildlife can flourish, and, perhaps most important of all, act as a powerful carbon sink.
For too long we have focused solely on terrestrial habitats such as forests, peatlands and certain soil types as effective ways to manage natural carbon sinks.
Carbon sinks and climate change; forests in the fight against global warming.
We have all but destroyed one of the earth's most natural carbon sinks, thus knocking nature off balance and accelerating the GHG effect.
We are working hard to show that farmers and growers can be part of the solution to many of the challenges that lie ahead and more than half of the people interviewed say they think farmers can help in the fight against climate change, with the benefits offered by a variety of on-farm renewable energy, carbon sinks and other innovative green projects.
In addition, forests act as carbon sinks, soaking up the carbon dioxide that we humans continually pump into the atmosphere, and purifying the air for us.
Biofuels are taking over agricultural land and forcing farming to expand into lands that are important carbon sinks, like forests and wetlands," the report said.
The clearing of forests and other natural cover to create land for grazing and crop production also destroys important carbon sinks.
In this way, Europe's forests will continue to act as huge carbon sinks and help tackle global warming.
We must also work together to move towards the IETA vision of a larger, more liquid market that evolves to include all six Kyoto gases from a wider range of sources, taking carbon sinks into account, with scope to link to other GHG emissions trading markets meeting similar compliance objectives.
Other ARS scientists are studying rangeland (see Agricultural Research, October 2002) as well as farmland (see Agricultural Research, February 2001) as possible carbon sinks.