carbonyl

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carbonyl

[′kär·bə‚nil]
(organic chemistry)
A functional group found in organic compounds in which a carbon atom is doubly bonded to an oxygen atom (‒CO‒). Also known as carbonyl group.
References in periodicals archive ?
At 30-min intervals over a 5-h period, oxidation was arrested and both carbonyls and lipid peroxides were measured, the latter being assessed by the ferrous ammonium sulfate/xylenol orange method (FoX reagent; Pierce).
The amount of carbonyl you find in a pile of protein is a good estimate of the amount of protein that is dysfunctional,'' Forster said.
That is, the hydrogen bonding distribution obtained under the assumption of considering just the soft segment carbonyls as possible proton acceptors, using calorimetric data, smoothly agrees with hydrogen bonding distribution obtained by FTIR.
However, in the cis-1,3-CHDA configuration, the carbonyl oxygen of the ester is in proximity of the other ester, provided that the ester groups are in the axial position.
In order to determine the carbonyl content per mg of protein, the protein levels were measured at 280 nm in each sample.
These modified diamines exhibit reduced reaction rates with NCOs primarily because their NH groups are secondary and therefore can H-bond with the closest carbonyl to form a five-membered ring (Fig.
An excess proton is confined to the channel centre when both carbonyl groups point into the channel due to favourable charge-dipole interactions, whereas it resides preferentially in one of the monomers when one of the carbonyls points out.
The researchers of this study collected the following data: (a) air concentrations of VOCs, carbonyls, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, radon, and microorganisms; (b) values of temperature and relative humidity; (c) building characteristics; (d) HVAC characteristics; and (e) occupant perceptions of IAQ (Siple, 1999).
Commonly studied byproducts of oxidative damage are 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (DNA damage), MDA (lipid peroxidation), and protein carbonyls (protein oxidation).
Forster of the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth and his colleagues now report in the May 14 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that the brains of old mice possess many more oxygen-damaged proteins, known as protein carbonyls, than do those of youthful mice.
This new series of products provides sub-parts per billion removal of molecular contaminants including moisture, oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, iron carbonyls and nickel carbonyls.