carboxylic

(redirected from carboxyl)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

carboxylic

[¦kär‚bäk¦sil·ik]
(chemistry)
Having chemical properties resembling those of carboxylic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the spectrum of Schiff base L-2, the asymmetric carboxyl stretching (COO-) was observed at 1626 cm-1which shifted on complexation with metals like Cu(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) at 1629, 1629 and 1655 cm-1 respectively.
The EDC reacted initially with a carboxyl group of PLLA and then formed an amine-reactive O-acylisourea intermediate that quickly reacted with an amino group of the CS to form an amide bond releasing an isourea by-product.
This is attributed to the presence of carboxyl groups within the chemical structure of citric acid, which is shown in Figure 2.
The researchers synthesized gold nanoparticles whose surfaces were modified with various functional groups: a positively-charged amino group (-NH2), a negatively-charged carboxyl group (-COOH) or a neutral hydroxyl group (-OH).
enhancement in ionic conductivity with increasing salt concentration can be associated to the increase in the number of mobile charge carriers and the interaction between NH4+ ion with carboxyl group bring to high dispersion of H+ that increases the conductivity of the CMC-NH4SCN SBE system [14].
The negatively charged carboxyl groups arranged periodically on the molecular chain of PAAS after dissociation can provide structure frame for the growth of the HA nanocrystalline (17).
2]-centered radicals respectively with fullerene as a function of the carboxyl group rotate, [phi], with rotating step Iff see Fig.
Each is active only against the peptide bonds in protein molecules that have carboxyl groups donated by certain amino acids.
Most likely, in this pH range macromolecules are straightened by electrostatic repulsion of ionized carboxyl groups.
Shear stability also declined due to acetyl- oxidation of potato starch, owing to substitution of hydroxyl groups by acetyl, carboxyl and carbonyl groups.
The first chapter reviews basic carbohydrate chemistry including carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl modifications, glycosidic linkages, and polymerization.