carbro process

carbro process

[′kär‚brō ‚präs·əs]
(graphic arts)
A photographic method of making carbon prints in which tanning of pigmented gelatin occurs in a special bleach bath, and the gelatin yields prints made on bromide paper.
References in periodicals archive ?
A friend of Edward Weston and his son Brett, Miller was a master of their vivid color Carbro Process, which was featured last year at the Getty.
He honed both technical and artistic skills in film processing and developed his own images, becoming one of the first professional photographers shooting and developing early color photos, known as the tri-color carbro process which preceded the invention of color film.
Having more or less failed at cinematography, Outerbridge couldn't afford to let his hard-won edge in photography slip away as well, so he started familiarizing himself with the color carbro process.
and such remarkable pieces as Kandinsky (1937), a Cinzano ad in which a darkroom timer, yellow pigment paper and folding measuring stick refer directly to the carbro process (as well as to the Russian artist's interest in color symbolism).