card


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Related to card: birthday card, card games

card

1
1. 
a. short for playing card
b. (as modifier): a card game
c. (in combination): cardsharp
2. See compass card
3. Horse racing a daily programme of all the races at a meeting, listing the runners, riders, weights to be carried, distances to be run, and conditions of each race
4. short for printed circuit card See printed circuit See also cards

card

2
(formerly) a machine or comblike tool for carding fabrics or for raising the nap on cloth

card

[kärd]
(electronics)
A printed circuit board or other arrangement of miniaturized components that can be plugged into a computer or peripheral device.

card

(1)
A circuit board.

card

(2)

card

(hypertext)
An alternative term for a node in a system (e.g. HyperCard, Notecards) in which the node size is limited.
References in classic literature ?
Please place your money on the cards or I may get muddled in the reckoning.
So I ask you to put the money on your cards," replied Dolokhov.
As he sat musing over his cigarette his eyes fell upon a mirror before him, and in it he saw reflected a table at which four men sat at cards.
The man remained standing where he could watch the Frenchman's cards.
The two new cards lay face down on the table where they had been dealt to him.
Kearns himself drew two cards, but did not look at them.
Now bully boy,' said the stout man, raising his eyes from his cards for the first time, 'can't you let him speak?
And lastly, seated on some of the back benches, where they had already taken up their positions for the evening, were divers unmarried ladies past their grand climacteric, who, not dancing because there were no partners for them, and not playing cards lest they should be set down as irretrievably single, were in the favourable situation of being able to abuse everybody without reflecting on themselves.
I saw cards on the table, but no gold; only a heap of little written papers, and these all on Cluny's side.
And whereas there is now hardly a town of France or Italy in which you shall not see some noble countryman of our own, with that happy swagger and insolence of demeanour which we carry everywhere, swindling inn-landlords, passing fictitious cheques upon credulous bankers, robbing coach- makers of their carriages, goldsmiths of their trinkets, easy travellers of their money at cards, even public libraries of their books--thirty years ago you needed but to be a Milor Anglais, travelling in a private carriage, and credit was at your hand wherever you chose to seek it, and gentlemen, instead of cheating, were cheated.
Nothing can make matters worse than they are," she thought, despairingly, as Arnold dealt the cards for her.
Then he shrugged his shoulders and gathered up the cards.