cardiac glycoside


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Related to cardiac glycoside: digitalis, digoxin

cardiac glycoside

[‚kärd·ē‚ak ′glī·kə‚sīd]
(biochemistry)
A class of naturally occurring glycosides that exhibit the ability to strengthen the contraction of heart muscles.
References in periodicals archive ?
3,4) Contrary to cardiac glycosides, and most intravenous and oral inotropes, pimobendan does not increase myocardial oxygen consumption.
Acaricidal effects of cardiac glycosides, azadirachtin and neem oil against the camel tick, Hyalomma dromedaril (Acari: Ixodidae) .
This finding is particularly exciting because specific up-regulation of a proapoptotic factor, FasL, by a cardiac glycoside has not previously been described.
Currently, heart failure patients are treated with diuretics such as furosemide to reduce water volume; cardiac glycosides such as digoxin, which produce a positive inotropic effect in cardiac muscles to improve cardiac output; inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors; and medications that block [beta]-adrenergic receptors to the deleterious effects of neurohormones.
This study has reported the detoxification of Thevetia seed meal as well as a quantification of the cardiac glycoside content in the treated and untreated samples.
Oleander contains two potent cardiac glycosides or cardenolides, oleandrin and neriine, which are present in all parts of plant [6,10].
beta]-Adrenergic agonists and cardiac glycosides are two well-known cardiotonics in current inotropic therapy (Stevenson 1998; Felker and O'Connor 2001).
2) describe studies that support the possibility of de novo biosynthesis, in the adrenal, of a material whose overall physicochemical, immunocrossreactive, and chromatographic characteristics are indistinguishable from those of the cardiac glycoside (CG) digoxin and its dihydro analog (in which the lactone ring is fully saturated).
While the chemical identity of the inhibitor remained a mystery, the team's data suggested the compound had physiological effects similar to those of a cardiac glycoside called digitalis.