cardiac muscle


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cardiac muscle

[′kärd·ē‚ak ¦məs·əl]
(histology)
The principal tissue of the vertebrate heart; composed of a syncytium of striated muscle fibers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barry Byrne, pediatric cardiologist from the University of Florida and The Johns Hopkins University, will be collaborating with Osiris on the cardiac muscle regeneration product.
Taken together, the results identify the cardionogen family members as important modulators of cardiac muscle cell development.
But [skeletal muscle] could not provide the type of relentless work that cardiac muscle could.
In human cardiac muscle, multiple isoforms of cTnT have been described, which are expressed in fetal, adult, and diseased heart, resulting from alternative splicing of a single cTnT gene (3, 24, 25) composed of 17 exons spread over 17 kb.
A protein of comparatively small molecular mass (39 kDa), cTnT is rapidly released from injured cardiac muscle [2].
He also will explain the methods used to differentiate the MLPC into a variety of tissue types -- including bone, cartilage, fat, skeletal and cardiac muscle, liver, lung, neural, and endothelium.
But in the presence of triclosan, the normal communication between two proteins that function as calcium channels was impaired, causing skeletal and cardiac muscle failure.
The company says the partners will focus initially on developing a treatment in which a patient's own cardiac muscle cells-called cardiomyocytes-are used to replace damaged heart tissue.
Moreover, says Steele, the lactic acid created in large amounts by fructose is preferentially used by the heart--and that causes "otherwise soluble muscle protein, like cardiac muscle protein, [to precipitate] out of solution .
Cytokinetics Incorporated (NASDAQ:CYTK) and Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced a strategic collaboration to discover, develop and commercialize novel small-molecule therapeutics that activate cardiac muscle contractility for potential applications in the treatment of heart failure.
The project, funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health for $10 million over five years, will initially focus on culturing thick "patches" of cardiac muscle that could be grafted onto damaged hearts to improve their efficiency.
Some engineered tissues already are on the market, but other tissues, such as cardiac muscle, have been difficult to reproduce.