cardiac

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cardiac

1. of or relating to the heart
2. of or relating to the portion of the stomach connected to the oesophagus
3. a person with a heart disorder
4. Obsolete a drug that stimulates the heart muscle

cardiac

[′kärd·ē‚ak]
(anatomy)
Of, pertaining to, or situated near the heart.
Of or pertaining to the cardia of the stomach.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of hemodynamic instability during orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), estimating cardiac preload to optimize fluid management is essential.
This leads to an increase of left and right cardiac preload (autotransfusion), with later temporary increase in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output.
The estimation of variables like ventricular area and global end-diastolic volume offer better performance than the central venous pressure in determining cardiac preload.
1,3-5) High-output cardiac failure is the result of a steep increase in the cardiac preload owing to the steal phenomenon.
These drugs have multiple mechanisms of benefit, including acting on the midbrain to reduce the sensation of shortness of breath, decreasing oxygen consumption by reducing muscle activity, suppressing cough, reducing chemoreceptor sensitivity to carbon dioxide, and decreasing cardiac preload and sympathetic tone.
These drugs act on the midbrain to reduce the sensation of shortness of breath, decrease oxygen consumption by reducing muscle activity, suppress cough, reduce chemoreceptor sensitivity to carbon dioxide, and decrease cardiac preload and sympathetic tone.
To reduce cardiac preload and the workload of the heart, a patient may receive a diuretic and be placed on a fluid restriction.
Both of these medicines reduce cardiac preload and may provide relief of chest pain as well as lower blood pressure.
Building on previous publications showing that TRV027 has beneficial hemodynamic and renal effects in a canine model of heart failure, this new publication shows that when TRV027 is co-administered with furosemide, it reduces cardiac preload and afterload, while preserving the natriuretic and diuretic effects of furosemide, and protecting renal function.
With regard to the parameters reflecting the volume of cardiac preload as measured by TTE, the left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (4.