career


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career

  1. the sequence(s) ofprofessional or occupational positions in the life course of an individual.
  2. (by analogy with 1) any individual pattern or progression in a nonoccupational life course, e.g., the ‘deviant career’ of the drug user (BECKER, 1953) or the MORAL CAREER of the mental patient (GOFFMAN, 1964).
Occupational careers may either consist of a sequenced progression in terms of a hierarchy of status and income (as typical of many middle-class careers, see PROFESSIONS), or lack any clear structure or progression, as is more usual for manual workers. Gender differences affecting access to careers has been a recent topic of importance in the sociology of labour markets (e.g. Dex, 1985). See LABOUR MARKET, DUAL LABOUR MARKET.

Career

 

rapid and successful advancement in various fields, including public, scientific, and office work; the attainment of recognition, honor, or material rewards. The word “career” is also used to define a type of occupation or profession, such as a career artist or a career doctor. Careerism is the pursuit of personal success in office, scientific, or other work. It is mercenary in its aims and a detriment to the public interest.

References in classic literature ?
But for an unfortunate remark of his, he would no doubt have entered at once upon a successful career at Dawson's Landing.
The immediate cause of the decision was a somewhat sadder accident than was common, even in a career prolific in such things.
In labors he has been most abundant; and his success in combating prejudice, in gaining proselytes, in agi- tating the public mind, has far surpassed the most sanguine expectations that were raised at the com- mencement of his brilliant career.
She might have been unconsciously sucking in the sad poison, while a sharer of his conversation with her friend; and from the best, the purest of motives, might now be denying herself this visit to Ireland, and resolving to divide herself effectually from him and his connexions by soon beginning her career of laborious duty.
The promise of a smooth career, which my first calm introduction to Thornfield Hall seemed to pledge, was not belied on a longer acquaintance with the place and its inmates.
Possessed of abilities which might have raised him to distinction in almost any career that he could have chosen, he had nevertheless, from his youth upward, been a disgrace to all his relatives.
The son of a distinguished general, he began his career as attache to the military advisers of the Emperor.
Then I should have chosen a career for myself, I should have been a sluggard and a glutton, not a simple one, but, for instance, one with sympathies for everything sublime and beautiful.
Landfall and Departure mark the rhythmical swing of a seaman's life and of a ship's career.
No; at least, ere I deviate, I will advance far enough to see whither my career tends.
Born in poverty at Boston, January 19 1809, dying under painful circumstances at Baltimore, October 7, 1849, his whole literary career of scarcely fifteen years a pitiful struggle for mere subsistence, his memory malignantly misrepresented by his earliest biographer, Griswold, how completely has truth at last routed falsehood and how magnificently has Poe come into his own, For "The Raven," first published in 1845, and, within a few months, read, recited and parodied wherever the English language was spoken, the half-starved poet received $10
As to the latter part, I have no means of checking you," said I, "but at least it is not difficult to find out a few particulars about the man's age and professional career.