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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet if you have diabetes, your chances are only one-out-four that your health care system Hill actually monitor your blood sugar levels or teach you how to do it.
All told, according to the same RAND study, Americans receive appropriate care from their doctors only about half of the time.
Well, much of it has changed in the veterans health-care system, where advanced information technology today serves not only to deeply reduce medical errors, but also "to improve diagnoses and implement coordinated, evidence-based care.
In an instant, they can see not only all of the patient's latest data, but also a complete medical record going back as far as the mid-1980s, including records of care performed in any other VHA hospital or clinic.
Some companies do just that by subsidizing an employee's child or elder care costs.
is taking advantage of the company's subsidy benefit, Child Care Plus.
Child Care Plus gives me the option to choose a higher quality of care and education than I would otherwise be able to afford," says Harrell.
After the birth of her third daughter, Harrell used the program to obtain infant care only five miles from her home.
Question 2: "I believe that, due to the continual shortage of dollars available for long term care, both at state and national levels, a major focus on health care spending should be set into motion.
a tax deduction for all costs associated with paying for care in a long-term care setting.
Question 3: "From a purely negative focus, I think we will have continued decline in the private market, less than desirable reimbursement from both the Medicare and Medicaid funding sources, and a continued growth in regulations to monitor and control our industry because of perceived poor quality of care.
As an industry, we are making major leaps into alternate care services, which could help to curb the expenses that some components of the healthcare market have bled dry.